Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Identical DNA Codes Discovered in six Plant Species safter 32 billion searches

Published: Tuesday, April 10, 2012
Last Updated: Tuesday, April 10, 2012
Bookmark and Share
Analyzing massive amounts of data officially became a national priority recently when the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy announced the Big Data Research and Development Initiative. A multi-disciplinary team of University of Missouri researchers rose to the big data challenge when they solved a major biological question by using a groundbreaking computer algorithm to find identical DNA sequences in different plant and animal species.

Via ScienceDaily (Apr. 9, 2012) 

Analyzing massive amounts of data officially became a national priority recently when the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy announced the Big Data Research and Development Initiative. A multi-disciplinary team of University of Missouri researchers rose to the big data challenge when they solved a major biological question by using a groundbreaking computer algorithm to find identical DNA sequences in different plant and animal species.

 "Our algorithm found identical sequences of DNA located at completely different places on multiple plant genomes," said Dmitry Korkin, lead author and assistant professor of computer science. "No one has ever been able to do that before on such a scale."

"Our discovery helps solve some of the mysteries of plant evolution," said Gavin Conant, co-author and assistant professor of animal sciences. "Basic research on the plant genome provides raw materials and improves techniques for creating medicines and crops."

Previous studies found long strings of identical code in different species of animals' DNA. But before this new MU research, which was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, computer programs had never been powerful enough to find identical sequences in plant DNAs, because the identical sections weren't found at the same points.

The genomes of six animals (dog, chicken, human, mouse, macaque and rat) were compared to each other. Likewise, six plant species (Arabidopsis, soybean, rice, cottonwood, sorghum and grape) were compared to each other. Comparing all the genetic sequences took 4 weeks with 48 computer processors doing 1 million searches per hour for a grand total of approximately 32 billion searches.

Although the scientists found identical sequences between plant species, just as they did between animals, they suggested the sequences evolved differently.

"You would expect to see convergent evolution, but we don't," Conant said. "Plants and animals are both complex multi-cellular organisms that have to deal with many of the same environmental conditions, like taking in air and water and dealing with weather variations, but their genomes code for solutions to these challenges in different ways."

The MU team's research laid the groundwork for future studies into the reasons plants and animals developed different genetic mechanisms and how they function. Their basic research created a foundation for discoveries that may improve human life. Besides advancing genetic science's potential to fight disease, the code-analyzing computer program itself could help in the development of new medicines.

"The same algorithm can be used to find identical sequential patterns in an organism's entire set of proteins," said Korkin. "That could potentially lead to finding new targets for existing drugs or studying these drugs' side effects."


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,300+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Bacteria Implicated in Reproductive Disorders
Bacteria harbored in the male reproductive system may be responsible for prostatitis.
Thursday, March 17, 2016
Researchers Discover A New Mechanism of Proteins to Block HIV
Certain IFITM proteins block and inhibit cell-to-cell transmission of HIV.
Tuesday, September 29, 2015
Scientists Successfully Edit Genes of Dengue Fever Mosquitoes
This research could lead to methods for preventing mosquito-borne diseases.
Monday, September 07, 2015
Unraveling the Elusive Structure of HIV Protein
Snapshots of HIV virus’ proteins may help design new ways to fight the disease.
Monday, July 06, 2015
Key Component in Protein that Causes Cystic Fibrosis Identified
Scientists hope that this finding may lay the foundations for the development of new medications and improved therapies.
Thursday, May 21, 2015
Green Tea Extract and Exercise Hinder Progress of Alzheimer’s
A study led by University of Missouri researchers has determined that a compound found in green tea, and voluntary exercise, slows the progression of the disease in mice and may actually reverse its effects.
Thursday, May 07, 2015
New Transitional Stem Cells Discovered
New stem cells are easier to manipulate, could help future research on reproductive problems.
Friday, April 17, 2015
MU Researchers Discover Protein's Ability To Inhibit HIV Release
TIM-family proteins have the ability to block the release of HIV and other viruses.
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
MU Scientists Successfully Transplant, Grow Stem Cells in Pigs
New line of pigs do not reject transplants, will allow for future research on stem cell therapies.
Saturday, June 07, 2014
Stem Cells Successfully Transplanted and Grown in Pigs
New line of pigs do not reject transplants, which will allow for future research on stem cell therapies.
Thursday, June 05, 2014
Adult Stem Cells Could Hold Key to Creating Cure for Type 1 Diabetes
Combining bone marrow cells with new drug restores insulin production.
Tuesday, June 04, 2013
MU Scientists Build Harness for Powerful Radiation Cancer Therapy
Scientists created a gold nanoparticle that can transport powerful radioactive particles directly to tumors for treatment.
Thursday, February 07, 2013
Achieving Coexistence of Biotech, Conventional and Organic Foods in the Marketplace
Meeting at Vancouver, Canada, October 26-28, 2011; GMCC Coexistence Conference
Thursday, April 21, 2011
Gene, Stem Cell Therapy only needs to be 50 Percent Effective to Create a Healthy Heart, MU Researchers Find
Researchers have demonstrated that a muscular dystrophy patient should be able to maintain a normal lifestyle if only 50 percent of the cells of the heart are healthy.
Thursday, November 01, 2007
Researchers Grow Neural Blood Vessel Cells from Adult Stem Cells
Scientists develop adult stem cells from the blood of an mature animal that were able to be directed into specific cell types.
Monday, September 25, 2006
Scientific News
Liquid Biopsies: Miracle Diagnostic or Next New Fad?
Thanks to the development of highly specific gene-amplification and sequencing technologies liquid biopsies access more biomarkers relevant to more cancers than ever before.
Core-Shell Columns in HPLC: Food Analysis Applications
Explore the most recent applications of core-shell columns in food analysis.
Review of the Analysis of Haemoglobin A1c for Diabetes Diagnostics
This paper aims to clarify methods, units, quality requirements, reference and cutoff limits for hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and ratio of blood glucose/HbA1c on the basis of the results from Finnish quality control surveys by comparing them to the literature.
Colon Cancer Blocked in Mice
Case Western Reserve University Researchers block common type of colon cancer tumour in mice, laying groundwork for human clinical trial.
New Centre Offers Ultra-Speed Protein Analysis
UW-Madison researchers to establish development centre for next-gen protein measurement technologies.
Disrupting Tumour-Promotion in Humans
Researchers have modified an existing protein to represses a specific cancer-promoting ‘message’ within cells.
Protein Nanocages Could Improve Drug Design and Delivery
HHMI scientists have designed and built 10 large protein icosahedra that are similar to viral capsids that carry viral DNA.
Vaccine Strategy Targets Multiple Influenza Viruses
Scientists have identified vaccine-induced antibodies that can neutralize strains of influenza virus that infect humans.
Connectome Map More Than Doubles Human Cortex’s Known Regions
Researchers at NIH have developed software that automatically detects the “fingerprint” of each of these areas in an individual’s brain scans.
Discovered Through ‘Big Data’ Analysis
Researchers at the SBP have identified over 100 new genetic regions that affect the immune response to cancer.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,300+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,800+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!