Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Communities
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

NIST Focuses on Testing Standards to Support LOC Commercialization

Published: Wednesday, August 15, 2012
Last Updated: Wednesday, August 15, 2012
Bookmark and Share
Lab-on-a-chip devices are envisioned to one day revolutionize how laboratory tasks such as diagnosing diseases and investigating forensic evidence are performed.

However, a recent paper from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) argues that before LOC technology can be fully commercialized, testing standards need to be developed and implemented.

"A testing standard," explains NIST physical scientist and paper author Samuel Stavis, "defines the procedures used to determine if a lab on a chip device, and the materials from which it is made, conform to specifications." Standardized testing and measurement methods, Stavis writes, will enable MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) LOC manufacturers at all stages of production—from processing of raw materials to final rollout of products—to accurately determine important physical characteristics of LOC devices such as dimensions, electrical surface properties, and fluid flow rates and temperatures.

To make his case for testing standards, Stavis focuses on autofluorescence, the background fluorescent glow of an LOC device that can interfere with the analysis of a sample. Stavis states that multiple factors must be considered in the development of a testing standard for autofluorescence, including: the materials used in the device, the measurement methods used to test the device and how the measurements are interpreted. "All of these factors must be rigorously controlled for, or appropriately excluded from, a meaningful measurement of autofluorescence," Stavis writes.

Quality control during LOC device manufacturing, Stavis says, may require different tests of autofluorescence throughout the process. "There may be one measure of autofluorescence from the block of plastic that is the base material for a chip, another once the block has been fashioned into the substrate in which the functional components are embedded, and yet another as the final device is completed," Stavis says. "To manufacture lab on a chip devices with reliably low autofluorescence, accurate measurements may be needed at each stage."

Stavis also emphasizes that it is important not to confuse testing standards with product standards, and to understand how the former facilitates the latter. "A product standard specifies the technical requirements for a lab on a chip device to be rated as top quality," he says. "A testing standard is needed to measure those specifications, as well as to make fair comparisons between competing products."

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Forensic Facial Examiners Can Be Near Perfect
In what might be the first face-off of its kind, trained forensics examiners from the FBI and law enforcement agencies worldwide were far more accurate in identifying faces in photographs than nonexperts and even computers.
Wednesday, September 30, 2015
Contactless Fingerprint Technology is Coming
Quickly moving through security checkpoints by showing your hand to a scanner seems straight out of science fiction, but NIST is working with industry to bring fast, touchless fingerprint readers out of the lab and into the marketplace.
Tuesday, September 08, 2015
Determining the Age of Fingerprints
Watch the imprint of a tire track in soft mud, and it will slowly blur, the ridges of the pattern gradually flowing into the valleys. Researchers have tested the theory that a similar effect could be used to give forensic scientists a way to date fingerprints.
Wednesday, August 26, 2015
New Members of U.S National Commission on Forensic Science Announced
The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) today announced six appointments to the National Commission on Forensic Science.
Friday, August 07, 2015
Giving Cancer a Deadly Fever
Heat may be the key to killing certain types of cancer, and new research has yielded unexpected results that should help optimize the design of magnetic nanoparticles that can be used to deliver heat directly to cancerous tumors.
Thursday, June 18, 2015
Center for Improving Statistical Analysis of Forensic Evidence
The U.S. Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology has awarded Iowa State University up to $20 million over five years to establish a Forensic Science Center of Excellence focused on pattern and digital evidence.
Tuesday, June 09, 2015
Measuring Volumes of Key 'Lab on a Chip' Components
NIST found a combination of techniques to effectively measure microfluidic channels, achieving an accuracy of within 5 percent for both a channel's depth and its bottom's width.
Wednesday, April 22, 2015
NMR ‘Fingerprinting’ for Monoclonal Antibodies
Study by NIST researchers shows the use of NMR spectroscopy for measuring the structural congfiguration of monoclonal antibodies.
Thursday, April 16, 2015
Ultra-enriched Silicon Paves the Road to Quantum Computing
Using a relatively straightforward technique, a team of NIST researchers has created what may be the most highly enriched silicon currently being produced.
Wednesday, August 13, 2014
NIST, County Crime Lab Team Up on Ballistics Research
Partnership will contribute to a collection of topographic data from thousands of fired bullets and cartridge cases.
Tuesday, August 12, 2014
NIST Instrument Enables High-speed Chemical Imaging of Tissues
Researchers have demonstrated a dramatically improved technique for analyzing biological cells and tissues based on characteristic molecular vibration "signatures."
Wednesday, July 23, 2014
NIST Names Members of Forensic Science Resource Committees
The new members, selected for their expertise in law, psychology and quality assurance, will serve on three advisory committees.
Thursday, July 17, 2014
New NIST Metamaterial Gives Light a One-Way Ticket
The device could someday play a role in optical information processing and in novel biosensing devices.
Thursday, July 03, 2014
Technique Offers Arson Investigators Faster, More Accurate Results
The new process for analyzing debris for traces of fire accelerants is faster and more accurate than conventional methods and produces less waste.
Tuesday, June 17, 2014
NIST Presents an Infrastructure Plan to Strengthen Forensic Science Committees
NIST forensic science experts presented a plan for a new Organization of Scientific Area Committees (OSAC) at the first meeting of the National Commission on Forensic Science in Washington, D.C.
Sunday, February 09, 2014
Scientific News
High Throughput Mass Spectrometry-Based Screening Assay Trends
Dr John Comley provides an insight into HT MS-based screening with a focus on future user requirements and preferences.
How a Genetic Locus Protects Adult Blood-Forming Stem Cells
Mammalian imprinted Gtl2 protects adult hematopoietic stem cells by restricting metabolic activity in the cells' mitochondria.
Genetic Basis of Fatal Flu Side Effect Discovered
A group of people with fatal H1N1 flu died after their viral infections triggered a deadly hyperinflammatory disorder in susceptible individuals with gene mutations linked to the overactive immune response, according to a recent study.
The MaxSignal Colistin ELISA Test Kit from Bioo Scientific
Kit can help prevent the antibiotic apocalypse by keeping last resort drugs out of the food supply.
"Good" Mozzie Virus Might Hold Key to Fighting Human Disease
Australian scientists have discovered a new virus carried by one of the country’s most common pest mosquitoes.
Non-Disease Proteins Kill Brain Cells
Scientists at the forefront of cutting-edge research into neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s have shown that the mere presence of protein aggregates may be as important as their form and identity in inducing cell death in brain tissue.
Closing the Loop on an HIV Escape Mechanism
Research team finds that protein motions regulate virus infectivity.
New Class of RNA Tumor Suppressors Identified
Two short, “housekeeping” RNA molecules block cancer growth by binding to an important cancer-associated protein called KRAS. More than a quarter of all human cancers are missing these RNAs.
Potential Treatment for Life-Threatening Viral Infections Revealed
The findings point to new therapies for Dengue, West Nile and Ebola.
World’s First Therapeutic Venom Database
Open-source library describes nearly 43,000 effects on the human body.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos