Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

SDSC to House Data Repository for NIH Metabolomics Project

Published: Thursday, October 18, 2012
Last Updated: Thursday, October 18, 2012
Bookmark and Share
UC San Diego bioengineers to play key role in the five-year, $6 million program.

The San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California, San Diego, will house the data repository for a new project funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) aimed at accelerating the study of metabolomics, an emerging field of biomedical research that studies chemical processes that could help more clearly define the mechanisms underlying diseases, such as diabetes and obesity, and develop new strategies for treatment.

SDSC joins other UC San Diego research units and organizations, which were awarded $6 million over five years out of a larger NIH metabolome program investment. Shankar Subramaniam, a Distinguished Scientist with SDSC and chair of the Department of Bioengineering at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, is principal investigator (PI) for the project. Subramaniam is also an associate director of the UC San Diego Institute of Engineering in Medicine.

“I’m very excited about the prospect of collaborating with researchers in the Jacobs School, the School of Medicine, the San Diego Supercomputer Center, and others across the campus and the country,” said Subramaniam. “This work will lead to a systematic understanding of human physiology at the molecular level.”

Specifically, metabolomics is the study of small molecules called metabolites, found within cells and biological systems. Metabolites are produced or consumed in the chemical reactions that take place in the body to sustain life. The sum of all metabolites at any given moment – the metabolome – is a form of chemical readout of the state of health of the cell or body.

“This project builds on SDSC’s long-standing collaboration with Professor Subramaniam and our world-class expertise in scientific data management,” said SDSC Director Michael Norman, co-PI on the project. “That we will become a national data hub for other NIH-funded metabolomics projects makes this exciting for us.”

The metabolome project will provide insights into the millions of microorganisms living within us. The human body contains many more bacterial cells than human cells, and the project will provide new opportunities for researchers to understand the role that microorganisms living within the body play in human health, according to Subramaniam, who has extensive experience integrating “omics” data as well as experience coordinating other large-scale projects.

One of the expected outcomes of the NIH project is the ability to “metabo-type” individuals to get a detailed picture of their current metabolite profile, and recognize problems, such as insulin resistance. The effects of interventions, such as changes in diet and exercise as well as pharmaceuticals, could then be seen in updated metabo-type readings.

Through the SDSC data repository, bioengineers and other researchers at UC San Diego will organize and present all data from the three metabolome core centers across the country, as well as other metabolomics efforts. The data repository, along with a coordination center, will serve as a coordinating hub so that the awardees can function as a consortium.

This metabolomics project at UC San Diego is an extension of the successful Lipid Maps project. Lipids are just one metabolite, and the metabolomics work will extend researchers’ view beyond this metabolite to others, such as sugars, nucleic acids, amino acids, and hormones.

The $6 million in funding is part of an overall $51.4 million investment by the NIH in metabolomics. The awards are supported by the NIH Common Fund, which is taking a comprehensive approach to increasing the research capacity in metabolomics by funding a variety of initiatives in this area, including training, technology development, standards synthesis, and data sharing capability for this new field.

“We are excited about the potential advances in technology that will enable metabolomics analysis to be conducted in basic and clinical settings, resulting in the discovery of new diagnostic tools and yielding important clues about disease mechanisms,” said James M. Anderson, director of the NIH Division of Program Coordination, Planning and Strategic Initiatives, which oversees trans-NIH program areas, including those supported through the NIH Common Fund. “The new cross-cutting metabolomics initiatives will allow for better data sharing and coordination of metabolomics efforts both nationally and internationally.”

Regional Comprehensive Metabolomics Resource Cores

In addition of the Data Repository and Coordination Center award to UC San Diego, the NIH has awarded three Regional Comprehensive Metabolomics Resource Cores, aimed at increasing the national capacity to provide metabolomics profiling and data analysis services to investigators. They are:

•    University of California, Davis. This resource core will serve clinical and biomedical researchers across the West Coast, with access to cutting-edge tools, collaborations, and interpretation of data.
•    University of Michigan: This resource core is a fully integrated program that will provide researchers nationwide with the expertise and infrastructure for metabolomics in addition to training opportunities.
•    Research Triangle Institute in Research Triangle Park, N.C.: This core will serve as a regional metabolomics center and will offer a comprehensive range of services and collaborative opportunities for metabolomics technologies.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 5,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
Mass Spec Technology Drives Innovation Across the Biopharma Workflow
With greater resolving power, analytical speed, and accuracy, new mass spectrometry technology and techniques are infiltrating the biopharmaceuticals workflow.
One Step Closer to Precision Medicine for Chronic Lung Disease Sufferers
A study led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and National Jewish Health, has provided evidence of links between SNPs and known COPD blood protein biomarkers.
A Diversity of Genomes
New DNA from understudied groups reveals modern genetic variation, ancient population shifts.
“Sixth Sense” May Be More Than Just A Feeling
The NIH Study shows that two young patients with a mutation in the PIEZ02 have problems with touch and proprioception, or body awareness.
Gene Could Reduce Female Mosquitoes
Virginia Tech researchers have found a gene that can reduce female mosquitoes over many generations.
Biomolecular Manufacturing ‘On-the-Go’
Wyss Institute team unveils a low-cost, portable method to manufacture biomolecules for a wide range of vaccines, other therapies as well as diagnostics.
Improving Crop Efficiency with CRISPR
New study of CRISPR-Cas9 technology from Virginia Tech shows potential to improve crop efficiency.
Fighting Cancer with Sticky Nanoparticles
Treatment that uses bioadhesive nanoparticles drug carriers proved more effective than conventional treatments for certain cancers.
Stem Cell ‘Heart Patch’ Almost Perfected
Scientists aiming to perfect and test 3D "heart patches" in animal model, last hurdle before human patients.
Fighting Plant Pathogens with RNA
Researchers develop strategy that could lead to environmentally friendly fungicide to fight pathogens.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,000+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!