Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Nanofibrillar Cellulose Film to Ease Performing Medical Tests

Published: Thursday, October 25, 2012
Last Updated: Thursday, October 25, 2012
Bookmark and Share
New environmentally friendly, reliable nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) platforms are more diverse than plastic films.

New film can be made, for instance, hydrophobic, hydrophilic and the electric charge can be changed. This will enhance the possibility of conducting thousands of different medical tests at home or in physicians’ receptions instead of waiting for results from laboratories.

 A platform is coated with the new film in the factory. The film is injected with substances that will react to the tested substance. At the place of testing, blood, water or another test material will be applied on to the film. The antibody injected onto the film will absorb the sample, depending on whether it contains substances causing allergic reactions, or bacteria, for example. Then the test result is visualised with the help of colour changing chemistry, for example.

Thanks to the new film, various tests can be conducted faster without compromising reliability. It will now be easier to detect microbes that cause illnesses in the physician’s reception, or to monitor allergens at home. In addition to medical diagnostics, the film can be utilised to study water purity, for example, says doctoral candidate Hannes Orelma at Aalto University.

Previous attempts to produce a nanofibrillar cellulose platform have failed when the porous plate absorbed part of the sample. Now researchers have developed a method of producing a water proof nanofibrillar cellulose gel that will not absorb samples. They have also made great efforts to ensure sufficient film durability.

The article Surface Functionalized Nanofibrillar Cellulose (NFC) Film as a Platform for Immunoassays and Diagnostics was published in Biointephases journal. North Carolina State University participated in the study in addition to Aalto University. The research project was funded by Tekes - Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation. The article online (springerlink.com).


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,100+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Gut Microbiomes Of Infants Have An Impact On Autoimmunity
Exposure to pathogens early in life is beneficial to the education and development of the human immune system.
Tuesday, May 03, 2016
Efficiency record for black silicon solar cells jumps
Researchers from have obtained the record-breaking efficiency of 22.1% on nanostructured silicon solar cells as certified by Fraunhofer ISE CalLab
Tuesday, May 19, 2015
Nanocrystalline Cellulose Modified into an Efficient Viral Inhibitor
Researchers have succeeded in creating a surface on nano-sized cellulose crystals that imitates a biological structure.
Wednesday, April 16, 2014
Scientific News
The Rise of 3D Cell Culture and in vitro Model Systems for Drug Discovery and Toxicology
An overview of the current technology and the challenges and benefits over 2D cell culture models plus some of the latest advances relating to human health research.
Grant Supports Project To Develop Simple Test To Screen For Cervical Cancer
UCLA Engineering announces funding from Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.
Injecting New Life into Old Antibiotics
A new fully synthetic way to make a class of antibiotics called macrolides from simple building blocks is set to open up a new front in the fight against antimicrobial drug resistance.
Insight into Bacterial Resilience and Antibiotic Targets
Variant of CRISPR technology paired with computerized imaging reveals essential gene networks in bacteria.
Advancing Protein Visualization
Cryo-EM methods can determine structures of small proteins bound to potential drug candidates.
Alzheimer’s Protein Serves as Natural Antibiotic
Alzheimer's-associated amyloid plaques may be part of natural process to trap microbes, findings suggest new therapeutic strategies.
Slime Mold Reveals Clues to Immune Cells’ Directional Abilities
Study from UC San Diego identifies a protein involved in the directional ability of a slime mold.
How Do You Kill A Malaria Parasite?
Drexel University scientists have discovered an unusual mechanism for how two new antimalarial drugs operate: They give the parasite’s skin a boost in cholesterol, making it unable to traverse the narrow labyrinths of the human bloodstream. The drugs also seem to trick the parasite into reproducing prematurely.
Illuminating Hidden Gene Regulators
New super-resolution technique visualizes important role of short-lived enzyme clusters.
Supressing Intenstinal Analphylaxis in Peanut Allergy
Study from National Jewish Health shows that blockade of histamine receptors suppresses intestinal anaphylaxis in peanut allergy.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,100+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,500+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!