Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Creabilis Receives Prestigious Technology Strategy Board Biomedical Catalyst Award

Published: Tuesday, November 06, 2012
Last Updated: Monday, November 05, 2012
Bookmark and Share
£1.42m funding will drive development of new treatment for Atopic Dermatitis.

Creabilis SA has announced that it has been granted a prestigious Biomedical Catalyst funding award, of £1.42m. Creabilis is one of the first companies to receive this award that will be used to advance the development of its clinical stage topical kinase inhibitor, CT327.

The £180 million Biomedical Catalyst is an integrated translational funding programme jointly operated by the Medical Research Council and the Technology Strategy Board providing responsive and effective support for the best life science opportunities arising in the UK.

It was announced by the Prime Minister David Cameron in December 2011 as part of the UK Government’s Life Sciences Strategy.

The award will be used by Creabilis in a £2.37m project to further develop CT327, a novel, first-in-class topical kinase inhibitor that is in clinical development to treat a number of dermatological diseases.

Specifically, the funding will be used to support a Phase IIb clinical study to further evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT327 in patients with Atopic Dermatitis.

Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is a poorly treated dermatological disorder, often described as an ‘itch with a rash’. The number of people with AD has increased more than three fold in the past 30 years, with over 1 million people affected in the UK alone.

It has a significant impact on patients’ and carers’ quality of life, the disease being particularly prevalent amongst children.

Although some older treatments exist, there is a significant need for new therapies that are safe for long term use and address all features of the disease, including itch.

CT327 has been developed using Creabilis’ Low Systemic Exposure (LSE) technology that creates ‘topical-by-design’ drugs optimized for high local and low systemic exposures.

Previously, in an international Phase IIa study, CT327 was effective in treating all aspects of AD and has proven safe and well tolerated in a further five clinical studies.

Dr Eliot Forster, CEO of Creabilis, said: “It is satisfying to have won this highly prestigious award and we are grateful to the Technology Strategy Board for their diligence. We firmly believe that CT327 will make a real difference to patients suffering from Atopic Dermatitis. The Biomedical Catalyst funding will enable us to complete this important study bringing CT327 one step closer to all patients suffering from this common and poorly treated disease.”


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,200+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,600+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Creabilis Announces Treatment of First Patients in its Phase 2b Trial of CT327
Phase 2b study of CT327 in patients with atopic dermatitis.
Monday, September 23, 2013
Creabilis Announces New Appointments to its Scientific Advisory Board
Appointment of Professor Gil Yosipovitch and Professor Praveen Anand to Company’s Board.
Monday, July 29, 2013
Creabilis Announces Headline Results of its Phase 2b Trial of CT327
Clinically and statistically significant reduction of chronic pruritus (itch) seen in psoriasis patients.
Friday, May 10, 2013
Creabilis Appoints Dr Simon Russell as Chief Business Officer
Dr Russell to maximize the commercial potential of Company’s products and technology.
Thursday, May 03, 2012
Creabilis Raises €15M ($20M) in Series B Fundraising Round
Funds to advance development of Creabilis’ first-in-class products.
Wednesday, October 05, 2011
Scientific News
Platelets are the Pathfinders for Leukocyte Extravasation During Inflammation
Findings from the study could help in the prevention and treatment of inflammatory pathologies.
ASMS 2016: Targeting Mass Spectrometry Tools for the Masses
The expanding application range of MS in life sciences, food, energy, and health sciences research was highlighted at this year's ASMS meeting in San Antonio, Texas.
Benchtop Automation Trends
Gain a better understanding of current interest in and future deployment of benchtop automated systems.
Some Women With PCOS May Have Adrenal Disorder
Researchers at NIH have found that a subgroup of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a leading cause of infertility, may produce excess adrenal hormones.
Alzheimer's Genetics Point To New Research Direction
A University of Adelaide analysis of genetic mutations which cause early-onset Alzheimer’s disease suggests a new focus for research into the causes of the disease.
Penn State, TB Alliance, and GSK Partner To Discover New Treatments For TB
A new collaboration between TB Alliance, GSK, and scientists in the Eberly College of Science seeks to find new small molecules that can be used to create antibiotics in the fight against tuberculosis (TB).
Manufactured Stem Cells To Advance Clinical Research
Clinical-grade cell line will enable development of new therapies and accelerate early-stage clinical research.
How Cancer Spreads in the Body
Cancer cells appear to depend on an unusual survival mechanism to spread around the body, according to an early study led by Queen Mary University of London.
Fix for 3-Billion-Year-Old Genetic Error
Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a fix that allows RNA to accurately proofread for the first time.
“Amazing Protein Diversity” Discovered in Maize
The genome of the corn plant – or maize, as it’s called almost everywhere except the US – “is a lot more exciting” than scientists have previously believed. So says the lead scientist in a new effort to analyze and annotate the depth of the plant’s genetic resources.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,200+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,600+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!