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Heart Failure Drug Shows Promise in Phase III Clinical Trial

Published: Monday, November 12, 2012
Last Updated: Sunday, November 11, 2012
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Results were presented by John Teerlink at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2012.

Hospitalized heart failure patients who received the drug, serelaxin, in a phase III clinical trial had fewer disease symptoms and as a group experienced 37 percent fewer deaths over six months.

The results were presented Tuesday at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2012 in Los Angeles by John Teerlink, MD, co-principal investigator of the study.

“Current therapy for acute heart failure has remained unchanged for decades,” said Teerlink, a UCSF professor of medicine and director of the heart failure program at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

Teerlink continued, “Our findings suggest serelaxin holds promise as the first evidence-based therapy for acute heart failure to substantially improve patients’ symptoms and clinical outcomes, including death.”


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