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AMSBIO Launches NuFF-RQ™

Published: Monday, December 03, 2012
Last Updated: Monday, December 03, 2012
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Qualified human feeder cells for iPSC reprogramming.

AMSBIO has announced the launch of Newborn Human Foreskin Fibroblasts qualified for induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) reprogramming.

During cellular reprogramming the feeder layer can greatly affect the health of the cell culture and the success of the reprogramming.

While a range of inactivated fibroblasts can be used as a support layer for pluripotent cell culture, not all will support mRNA reprogramming.

Newborn Human Foreskin Fibroblasts (NuFF-RQ™) have been functionally validated to support the generation of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) colonies providing an optimized feeder layer during mRNA reprogramming.

AMSBIO have added NuFF-RQ™ to their range of Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts (MEFs) and Newborn Human Foreskin Fibroblasts (NuFFs) for stem cell culture experimentation.

All AMSBIO feeder cells are meticulously derived and comprehensively tested on mouse and human ES stem cells to ensure robust and consistent performance with every lot.

Fully qualified, ready-to-use feeder cells save users the time and trouble of dealing with an animal facility, dissections, cell expansion and lot-to-lot variation.

Having undergone comprehensive safety tests including human pathogen and mycoplasma detection, AMSBIO’s feeder cells significantly reduce the threat of contamination in users iPSC reprogramming experiments.

NuFF-RQ™ qualified cells are available in conjunction with AMSBIO’s highly modified synthetic 5-capped mRNAs for safe, non-integrated human cell reprogramming.


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