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The Olympus DP26 Standalone Camera Controller, for Rapid Sample Browsing and Data Capture

Published: Monday, December 10, 2012
Last Updated: Monday, December 10, 2012
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Instantaneous imaging, without the need for a computer.

Olympus has released a new standalone controller for the 5 megapixel DP26 camera. Using the controller, it is possible to view samples and capture images directly on a monitor screen with no need for a dedicated computer. This means the system can be used to capture images in mere seconds, rather than having to start a PC. Small and lightweight, the unit can be easily transferred between laboratories, takes up very little bench space and provides intuitive control of the DP26 camera’s functions. Images can be saved to a USB memory stick via the inbuilt USB port or to a networked drive via Ethernet connection, and can be viewed using the on-screen menu. This expands the benefits of the DP26 to make it ideal for intensive or rapid sample browsing, collaborative workflows and prolonged use, especially where there is little space, need or time for running a computer system.

The new DP26 standalone controller can be optimally positioned for user comfort and allows ultra-fast imaging, without needing to boot up a computer or load dedicated software. This is especially useful for applications such as cell culture and pathology, as well as for microscopes shared by large groups. Using the controller, the camera can be linked directly to a monitor screen, while providing simple and intuitive control of digital zoom, image capture and colour balance.

Image and video capture is fast and simple, all at the touch of a single button. With a USB connection, the standalone controller permits storage of videos and images, with exposure settings, magnifications, and other parameters stored for future reference. Images can also be saved to a shared folder on a networked drive via the Ethernet connection. The optional connection of a USB mouse and keyboard allows rapid menu navigation, precise measurements and direct comment writing on images, if required.

Sample evaluation and documentation is greatly enhanced by the ‘instant’ hands-on control provided by the standalone controller. Utilising the progressive scan readout, the DP26 is capable of producing totally fluid imaging at up to 16 frames per second, while avoiding the occurrence of any distracting artefacts. This permits monitor-based viewing as a valid alternative to oculars, removing any associated physical strain and improving user comfort during prolonged use.

The expanded screen display improves precision and diminishes risk of error in sample evaluation and micro-manipulation, while the natural colour rendition of the DP26 camera allows truly accurate collaborative analysis, teaching and data presentation. Any monitor or projector can be connected to the DVI-I port, giving you the freedom to use the ideal output device for your application. In addition, the Full HD digital output makes it easy to connect to larger installations such as teaching rooms, or a projector.

Flavio Giacobone, Product Manager for Micro-Imaging Solutions Division at Olympus Europa, said: “The new standalone controller extends the qualities of the DP26 camera in a new direction, offering a powerful, high resolution imaging system which is fully operational in seconds, all at the touch of a button. Natural details and colours of the sample are now extended to the digital monitor, assisting intuitive and confident handling and analysis, whether during intensive routine duties, or when sharing with an audience.”


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