Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Winning the Battle against Leukaemia: Positive Early Results in Clinical Trial for DNA Vaccine

Published: Tuesday, December 11, 2012
Last Updated: Tuesday, December 11, 2012
Bookmark and Share
Early results of a trial to treat leukaemia with a WT1 DNA vaccine, has shown robust vaccine-specific antibody responses in all vaccinated patients evaluated to date.

Furthermore, T cell immune responses, including those of the “killer T cells,” were detected. Antibody and T cell responses are strong signals of the DNA vaccine’s potential to treat the disease.

Presented at the DNA Vaccines 2012 conference in California by Christian Ottensmeier, the trial’s principal investigator and Professor of Experimental Cancer Research at the University of Southampton, these interim results, from eight patients, are part of a phase II trial that will enroll 31 patients in its chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) arm.

To date, 14 CML patients have been enrolled while another 13 unvaccinated CML patients have been enrolled to serve as a control group. The vaccine has been shown to be safe overall and well-tolerated in the trial subjects. A detailed analysis of T cell immune responses as well as the impact of the vaccination on the molecular marker, BCR-ABL, which is a specific chromosomal abnormality that is associated with CML disease, will be performed during the trial.

As a result of the favourable safety and immunogenicity profiles observed in the CML vaccinated group, the trial is now open to enroll the acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) clinical trial arm, with a total target of 37 subjects in each of the vaccinated and control groups.

Professor Ottensmeier comments: "These preliminary data show strong vaccine-induced immune responses in vaccinated subjects in the CML arm. We are looking forward to enrolling and testing the vaccine’s impact in AML patients, who currently have limited treatment options and a low rate of progression free survival."

This open-label, multi-center phase II clinical trial is evaluating a DNA vaccine-based immune therapy to treat these two types of leukaemia. The DNA vaccine, developed by the University of Southampton, is delivered using Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc proprietary electroporation technology. The trial is funded by research charity Leukaemia and Lymphoma Research (LLR) and the National Institute for Health Research Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation Programme.

Leukemia is a cancer of the bone marrow and blood that accounts for at least 300,000 new cases and 222,000 deaths worldwide each year - a very high death rate. Wilms' Tumor gene 1 (WT1) is highly associated with these types of cancer. Preclinical data from mice showed strong induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and the ability to kill human tumor cells expressing WT1. This is the first study to combine DNA vaccination with electroporation delivery of WT1 antigens with the goal of stimulating high and durable levels of immune responses, in particular T cells, which are considered critical for improving clinical outcomes for this disease.

In this ongoing phase II trial, all participants initially receive six doses of two DNA vaccines (called p.DOM-WT1-37 and p.DOM-WT1-126) delivered at four week intervals. Vaccine responders may continue with booster vaccinations every three months out to 24 months. An additional 60 to 75 AML/CML patients are being enrolled across the two arms as non-vaccinated controls for comparison. The primary endpoints are molecular response to a disease marker called BCR-ABL in CML patients and time to disease progression in AML patients. The study is also monitoring WT1 transcript levels, immune responses to the WT1 antigen, time to progression and overall survival, and two-year survival in the AML group. The trial is taking place at hospitals in Southampton, London and Exeter.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 4,000+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 5,300+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Cell’s ‘Built-In Circuit’ Help Prevent Tumour Growth
Researchers have created cells with a 'built-in genetic circuit' that inhibits tumour growth.
Monday, November 28, 2016
Tapping the Unused Potential of Photosynthesis
Reengineering photosynthesis for chemical reactions involved in biofuel, pharmaceuticals and fine chemical production.
Thursday, September 08, 2016
Copper Destroys MRSA at a Touch
New research from the University of Southampton shows that copper can destroy MRSA spread by touching and fingertip contamination of surfaces.
Thursday, February 25, 2016
Boost in the Fight Against Infection, Cancer and Allergies
New research has uncovered an important mechanism in the drive to understand immunological processes that protect us against infection, allergy and cancer.
Monday, November 09, 2015
Promising Developments In Tackling Resistance To Blood Cancer Drugs
A new drug with the potential to reverse resistance to immunotherapy has been developed by scientists at the University of Southampton.
Wednesday, April 15, 2015
£1.4M Funding to Safeguard Global Food Security
Researchers are part of a project that has received £1.4 million in new funding to explore how plants manipulate soils to extract more water and nutrients.
Wednesday, October 15, 2014
Nanoparticle Research Could Enhance Drug Delivery Through Skin
A milestone study from the University of Southampton could have major implications for the delivery of drugs.
Wednesday, October 15, 2014
Sensor Detects Harmful Bacteria on Food Industry Surfaces
A new device designed to sample and detect foodborne bacteria is being trialled by scientists at the University of Southampton.
Thursday, June 26, 2014
Honeybees' Foraging for Flowers Masked by Diesel Fumes
Exposure to common air pollutants found in diesel exhaust pollution can affect the ability of honeybees to recognise floral odours, new University of Southampton research shows.
Tuesday, October 08, 2013
Suffocating Tumours Could Lead to New Cancer Drugs
Scientists have discovered a new molecule that prevents cancer cells from responding and surviving when starved of oxygen.
Tuesday, July 30, 2013
Protecting Drinking Water Systems from Deliberate Contamination
An international project has developed a response programme for rapidly restoring the use of drinking water networks following a deliberate contamination event.
Tuesday, July 09, 2013
Scientific News
Big Genetics in BC: The American Society for Human Genetics 2016 Meeting
Themes at this year's meeting ranged from the verification, validation, and sharing of data, to the translation of laboratory findings into actionable clinical results.
Stem Cells in Drug Discovery
Potential Source of Unlimited Human Test Cells, but Roadblocks Remain.
Automated Low Volume Dispensing Trends
Gain a better understanding of the current and future market requirements for fully automated LVD systems.
Personality Traits, Psychiatric Disorders Linked to Specific Genomic Locations
Researchers have unearthed genetic correlations between personality traits and psychiatric disorders.
Forensic 3D Documentation of Skin Injuries
In this study, the validity of using photogrammetry for documenting injuries in a pathological context was demonstrated.
3-D Printed Dog’s Nose Improves Vapor Detection
By mimicking how dogs get their whiffs, a team of government and university researchers have demonstrated that “active sniffing” can improve by more than 10 times the performance of current technologies that rely on continuous suction to detect trace amounts of explosives and other contraband.
New Markers for Forensic Body-fluid Identification
University of Bonn researchers have successfully identified specific Micro-RNA signatures to help forensically identify body fluids.
Genetics Control Regenerative Properties Of Stem Cells
Researchers define how genetic factors control regenerative properties of blood-forming stem cells.
Major Neuroscience Initiative Launched
Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute invest $115 million to further expand neuroscience research, while Caltech construct $200 million biosciences complex.
Making It Personal
Cancer vaccine linked to increased immune response against leukemia cells.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
4,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,300+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!