Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Gene Variations Linked to Lung Cancer in Non-Smokers

Published: Friday, December 14, 2012
Last Updated: Thursday, December 13, 2012
Bookmark and Share
NIH researchers conduct the largest genome-wide association studies in female never-smokers to date.

Researchers identified 3 genetic regions that predispose Asian women who’ve never smoked to lung cancer.

The finding provides evidence that lung cancer among never-smokers can differ on a fundamental level from lung cancer in smokers.

Up to 90% of lung cancer deaths can be attributed to smoking. But lung cancer in people who never smoked is still the seventh leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide.

Many women in Eastern Asia who’ve been diagnosed with lung cancer have never smoked. Environmental factors, such as secondhand smoke or exhaust from indoor cooking, likely account for some cases.

But in most regions of Eastern Asia, they explain only a small proportion of these cases.

To gain a better understanding of lung cancer in Asian females who never smoked, researchers from NIH’s National Cancer Institute (NCI) partnered with colleagues from several other countries to conduct the largest genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in female never-smokers to date.

GWAS scan the genomes of large numbers of people to find genetic variations associated with a particular disease or trait.

The scientists combined data from 14 studies from mainland China, South Korea, Japan, Singapore, Taiwan and Hong Kong that involved a total of about 14,000 Asian women (6,600 with lung cancer and 7,500 without the disease).

Some of these studies included data on environmental factors, such as exposure to secondhand smoke. The results were published in the December 2012 issue of Nature Genetics.

The researchers found that variations at 3 locations in the genome-2 on chromosome 6 and another on chromosome 10-were associated with lung cancer in Asian females who’d never smoked.

The discovery on chromosome 10 was particularly noteworthy, since it hadn’t been identified in any previous GWAS of lung cancer.

Variations at a location on chromosome 15 have been linked to lung cancer risk in many previous GWAS of lung cancer that were conducted primarily in smokers.

In the new study, however, the researchers didn’t detect an association with this region. The finding suggests that the variations associated with lung cancer on chromosome 15 may be smoking-related.

The researchers did find evidence that Asian women with one of the newly identified genetic variants may be more susceptible to the effects of environmental tobacco smoke. However, more research will be needed to prove the connection.

“This study is the first large-scale genome-wide association study of lung cancer among never-smoking females anywhere in the world,” says lead investigator Dr. Qing Lan of NCI.

The findings illustrate how GWAS can yield insights into inherited genetic risk in populations with unique characteristics or environmental exposures.

“Our study provides strong evidence that common inherited genetic variants contribute to an increased risk of lung cancer among Asian women who have never smoked,” says coauthor Dr. Nathaniel Rothman of NCI.

Dr. Rothman continued, “These variants may also increase lung cancer risk associated with environmental factors, such as environmental tobacco smoke.”


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,300+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,900+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

New Medication Shows Promise Against Liver Fibrosis in Animal Studies
Liver fibrosis is a gradual scarring of the liver that puts people at risk for progressive liver disease and liver failure.
Thursday, July 28, 2016
NIH Begins Yellow Fever Vaccine Trial
NIH has initiated an early-stage clinical trial of a vaccine to protect against yellow fever.
Thursday, July 28, 2016
Targeting Autoimmunity
Researchers have developed a strategy to treat a rare autoimmune disease which could lead to treatments of other autoimmune diseases.
Wednesday, July 27, 2016
Molecule May Affect Gaucher, Parkinson's Disease
Research has identified a molecule that restores activity of a dysfunctional enzyme linked to Gaucher and Parkinson's disease.
Wednesday, July 27, 2016
Uncovering Rhinovirus C Structure
Researchers have determined the structure of rhinovirus C. Their findings may aid the development of antiviral therapies and vaccines.
Wednesday, July 27, 2016
Vaccine Strategy Targets Multiple Influenza Viruses
Scientists have identified vaccine-induced antibodies that can neutralize strains of influenza virus that infect humans.
Monday, July 25, 2016
Connectome Map More Than Doubles Human Cortex’s Known Regions
Researchers at NIH have developed software that automatically detects the “fingerprint” of each of these areas in an individual’s brain scans.
Saturday, July 23, 2016
Uncovering a New Principle in Chemotherapy Resistance in Breast Cancer
The NIH study has revealed an entirely unexpected process for acquiring drug resistance that bypasses the need to re-establish DNA damage repair in breast cancers that have mutant BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes.
Thursday, July 21, 2016
Brain Circuits Helps People Cope With Stress
Researchers at NIH have identified brain patterns in humans that appear to underlie “resilient coping,” to stress that help some people handle stressful situations better than others.
Wednesday, July 20, 2016
NIH Investment Into HIV Research Expands
Funding has been awarded to six research teams to lead collaborative investigations worldwide toward an HIV cure.
Thursday, July 14, 2016
Treatment Advancement for Gaucher and Parkinson's Diseases
NIH scientists identify molecule that may act as a possible treatment of neurological diseases.
Wednesday, July 13, 2016
Use it or Lose it: Visual Activity Regenerates Links Between Eye, Brain
The mouse study is first to show visual stimulation helps re-wire visual system and partially restores sight.
Tuesday, July 12, 2016
NIH Funds Million-Person Medicine Study
NIH announces $55million in awards to build foundations for ambitious Cohort Program that aims to engage 1 million participants in lifestyle, environments and genetics research.
Friday, July 08, 2016
Largest-Ever Study of Breast Cancer Genetics in Black Women
The study will identify genetic factors that may underlie breast cancer disparities.
Thursday, July 07, 2016
NIH-Funded Center to Study Inefficiencies in Clinical Trials
Researchers at the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) and Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) have received a major federal grant to study how multisite clinical trials of new drugs and therapies in children and adults can be conducted more rapidly and efficiently.
Thursday, July 07, 2016
Scientific News
Breakthrough Flu Vaccine Inhibited by Pre-existing Antibodies
Universal truths – how existing antibodies are sabotaging the most promising new human flu vaccines.
Liquid Biopsies: Miracle Diagnostic or Next New Fad?
Thanks to the development of highly specific gene-amplification and sequencing technologies liquid biopsies access more biomarkers relevant to more cancers than ever before.
New Medication Shows Promise Against Liver Fibrosis in Animal Studies
Liver fibrosis is a gradual scarring of the liver that puts people at risk for progressive liver disease and liver failure.
Raw Eggs Deemed Safe to Eat
A report published today by the Advisory Committee on the Microbiological Safety of Food (ACMSF) into egg safety has shown a major reduction in the risk from salmonella in UK eggs.
Monitoring TTX Toxin in Shellfish
In a number of small studies, mussels and oysters from the eastern and northern part of the Oosterschelde in Holland were found to contain tetrodotoxin (TTX).
Gene Terapy for Muscle Wasting Developed
New gene therapy could save millions of people suffering from muscle wasting disease.
NIH Begins Yellow Fever Vaccine Trial
NIH has initiated an early-stage clinical trial of a vaccine to protect against yellow fever.
Gene-Editing 'Toolbox' Targets Multiple Genes Simultaneously
Researchers have designed a system that modifies, or edits, multiple genes in a genome at once while minimising unintentional effects.
Detecting Alzheimer's with Smell Test
Odour identification test may offer low-cost alternative for predicting cognitive decline and detecting early-stage Alzheimer’s disease.
Antibody Drug Shows Promise in HIV Treatment
Researchers are a step closer to an alternative HIV treatment that has the potential for lasting effects and less frequent dosing.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,300+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,900+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!