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Modular Flow Reactor Systems

Published: Friday, December 14, 2012
Last Updated: Friday, December 14, 2012
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New systems provide users with greater flexibility and broader synthesis capabilities.

Uniqsis has announced a new portfolio of modular flow systems, based around its Binary Pump Module (BPM) and FlowSyn™ flow reactor technology to provide users with greater flexibility and broader synthesis capabilities.

Uniqsis developed the original two-channel FlowSyn™ flow reactor system as a fully integrated ‘one box’ solution to make the emerging technology of continuous flow chemistry easily accessible to anyone with an interest in exploring and exploiting this exciting field of research.

This system, which handles simple homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions at the push of a button, represents an easy, hassle-free entry into continuous flow chemistry.

As users and applications have become more sophisticated, Uniqsis has developed more powerful and sophisticated FlowSyn™ systems, culminating in the FlowSyn™ Auto LF capable of executing multi-step, multi-reagent experiments completely automatically and unsupervised.

Since then, the number and variety of applications for continuous flow chemistry have continued to proliferate, requiring flow systems to be ever more flexible and more easily customized by users.

Uniqsis has responded to these requirements by developing the versatile Binary Pump Module (BPM), a stand-alone two-channel high-pressure reagent delivery system which can form the basis of a modular continuous flow system.

Users can add reactor modules of their choice to the BPM to create a modular system tailored to their specific application, with the BPM and its dedicated control software acting as the ‘hub’ for the system.

Uniqsis supplies a wide range of reactor modules and accessories for this purpose, including column, coil and chip reactors, heating and cooling modules, fraction collectors and data collection and reporting modules.

The latest module in the line-up is the Polar Bear Plus Flow reactor module which offers cooling technology in a compact and portable package.

Delivering temperatures from -40°C to +150°C without the need for cardice or liquid nitrogen, it can operate independently or be controlled via the BPM as a standalone flow chemistry system.

Capable of pumping up to 100 ml/min and operating at up to 200 bar, the BPM is available in a choice of three flow paths - PTFE, stainless steel and Hastelloy® - for optimum chemical compatibility.

To help users configure systems for their applications, Uniqsis has included a useful interactive system builder on its website www.uniqsis.com.

Paul Pergande, Managing Director of Uniqsis, comments: “It’s very exciting for us to be at the forefront of this dynamic new technology and to be able to develop our product offering in line with user requirements. When continuous flow chemistry first came into being, our goal was to make simple applications easily accessible to anyone who wanted to get to know the technology. The emphasis now is to ensure that users can exploit the technology to its full extent by giving them the tools and flexibility to develop new and exciting applications not previously attempted.”


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