Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Graeme Bell Receives International Diabetes Prize

Published: Tuesday, December 18, 2012
Last Updated: Monday, December 17, 2012
Bookmark and Share
Prize includes a certificate of honor, a Japanese objet d’art and a $150,000 prize.

Graeme Ian Bell, the Louis Block Distinguished Service Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics and an investigator in the Kovler Diabetes Center at the University of Chicago, has been awarded the Manpei Suzuki International Prize for 2012 for his pioneering work in understanding the role of genetics in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes.

Inaugurated in 2008 to commemorate the 15th anniversary of the Manpei Suzuki Diabetes Foundation, the prize honors “those who have enlightened researchers in the field of diabetes around the world with their original and excellent scientific achievements.”

Bell is being recognized, according to the selection committee, for his “extensive and groundbreaking contributions over many years to many landmark discoveries in diabetes research utilizing the powerful technologies of molecular biology and genetics.”

He will receive the prize and present a commemorative lecture at the award ceremony in Tokyo on Feb. 5, 2013.

Bell is the second scientist from the University of Chicago to win this prestigious award in the five years it has been given. His colleague Donald F. Steiner, the A.N. Pritzker Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Medicine and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, received the award for 2009.

“This is a wonderful honor and a very pleasant surprise,” Bell said. “I am proud to find myself among such distinguished company and pleased that work from our laboratory and our many collaborators has had an impact on the field and been recognized in this way.”

Bell studies the genetics of diabetes mellitus and the biology of the insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cell. He cloned and characterized many of the genes that are key in the regulation of glucose metabolism including insulin, glucagon, glucose transporters and many others.

Working with colleague Nancy Cox, Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics and Section Chief of Genetic Medicine, Bell discovered mutations in the genes for glucokinase and for three transcription factors that cause an early-onset form of diabetes called maturity-onset diabetes of the young.

Once thought to be very rare, this form of diabetes represents up to 5 percent of cases. Correct genetic diagnosis can alter treatment and improve clinical outcome.

“Perhaps the most remarkable aspect of Graeme’s research in diabetes is its scope,” Cox said. “He has made fundamental discoveries, but he also wants to make sure that patients benefit quickly from those advances. He engages with scientists in health care economics to evaluate the costs and benefits of translating the research findings into routine patient care, and works with clinicians to develop protocols for that translation. Few have the ability and the drive to do basic, translational and clinical research so effectively. This is a well-deserved honor.”

Bell is a key member of the University of Chicago Medicine’s diabetes genetics team, whose work involves using genetics to personalize treatment targeted to a patient’s specific genetic defect.

Babies with diabetes provide the most dramatic example of this approach. Nearly half have diabetes due to mutations in genes. Some of these children can be treated with pills that compensate for the genetic defect, rather than with insulin shots.

More than 1,500 patients and family members are now participating in genetic studies aimed at improving treatment through a better understanding of genetics.

The Manpei Suzuki Diabetes Foundation promotes research on diabetes by encouraging international contacts among young scientists.

Manpei Suzuki, former chairman of the Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers’ Association of Japan, chairman of the Board of Directors of Sankyo Co. Ltd. and member of the Japanese House of Councilors, suffered from diabetes mellitus in the last years of his life.

In keeping with his last wishes, his widow Mitsu Suzuki established a foundation to support diabetes research.

According to the foundation, “more creative basic and applied studies are required due to the rapid aging of society which will occur in the 21st century.”

The international exchange among researchers that the foundation supports “will help improve health care technology and develop new health care resources in Japan. This, in turn, will lead to improvements in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diabetes, a disease which affects many people and can have serious consequences for their quality of life.”


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 4,000+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 5,300+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Long-sought Genetic Model of Common Infant Leukemia Described
Researchers from the University of Chicago have created the first mouse model for Pro-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
Tuesday, November 15, 2016
Including the Microbiome in Precision Medicine
Scientists suggest microbiome plays a significant enough role in human health that studies should be a part of future precision medicine initiatives.
Wednesday, November 02, 2016
Tumor Markers Reveal Lethality Of Bladder Cancers
Researchers found that detection of certain tumor cells in early stage cancers helps identify high-risk cancers.
Wednesday, October 26, 2016
Manipulation of Liquid Crystals Could Help Control Drug-Delivery Process
Computer modeling, real-world testing yields new method.
Wednesday, September 14, 2016
Liquid Crystal Manipulation Controls Drug-Delivery Process
Scientists have turned liquid crystals into a tool to control the shape of synthetic cell membranes.
Tuesday, September 13, 2016
Grad Student's Finding Enables Rapid Compound Screening
Grad student makes technical leap that could enable rapid screening of anti-cancer compounds.
Friday, August 19, 2016
From Fins to Fingers
New gene-editing methods help the mapping of cells linking fish fins and mammalian limbs.
Friday, August 19, 2016
New Technique Targets Ataxia Gene
Scientists selectively turn off the disease-causing portion of a gene that causes a severe form of ataxia.
Thursday, July 14, 2016
Organ Behaviour Manipulation Possible with New Injectable
Scientists develop injectable that could be used to stimulate nerve cells and manipulate muscle and organ behaviour.
Friday, July 08, 2016
New Microbiome Center to Merge Expertise of UChicago, MBL and Argonne
Researchers to study world of microbes across environments.
Wednesday, May 18, 2016
AbbVie, University of Chicago Collaborate
The University of Chicago and AbbVie have entered into a five-year collaboration agreement designed to improve the pace of discovery and advance medical research in oncology at both organizations.
Thursday, April 21, 2016
New Code for Control of Gene Expression
A new cellular signal discovered by a team of scientists at the University of Chicago and Tel Aviv University provides a promising new lever in the control of gene expression.
Thursday, February 18, 2016
Bacterial Circadian Clocks Set by Metabolism, Not Light
New study finds that metabolism is the primary driver of the circadian rhythm.
Monday, December 14, 2015
New Nanomanufacturing Technique Advances Imaging, Biosensing Technology
Researchers invent a novel way to build nanolenses in large arrays using a combination of chemical and lithographic techniques.
Thursday, December 10, 2015
Enormous Genetic Variation May Shield Tumors from Treatment
Debate over Darwinian selection vs. random mutations emerges at the tumor level.
Wednesday, November 11, 2015
Scientific News
Big Genetics in BC: The American Society for Human Genetics 2016 Meeting
Themes at this year's meeting ranged from the verification, validation, and sharing of data, to the translation of laboratory findings into actionable clinical results.
Stem Cells in Drug Discovery
Potential Source of Unlimited Human Test Cells, but Roadblocks Remain.
Automated Low Volume Dispensing Trends
Gain a better understanding of the current and future market requirements for fully automated LVD systems.
Cancer Genetics: Key to Diagnosis, Therapy
When applied judiciously, cancer genetics directs caregivers to the right drug at the right time, while sparing patients of unnecessary or harmful treatments.
Major Neuroscience Initiative Launched
Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute invest $115 million to further expand neuroscience research, while Caltech construct $200 million biosciences complex.
Diabetes Missing Link Discovered
Researchers from the University of Auckland have shown that beta catenin plays a vital role in the control of insulin release from the pancreas.
Study Reveals New Role for Hippo Pathway in Suppressing Cancer Immunity
Hippo pathway signaling regulates organ size by moderating cell growth, apoptosis and stem cell renewal, but dysregulation contributes to cancer development.
Ribosome Recycling as a Drug Target
Researchers explain mechanism that recycles bacterial ribosomes stalled on messenger RNAs that lack termination codons.
How the Brain Recognizes Faces
Machine-learning system spontaneously reproduces aspects of human neurology.
Boosting Effectiveness of Asthma Therapy
A team of scientists from UCSF has developed a new treatment to dampen bronchospasm.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
4,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,300+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!