Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Communities
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Baylor College of Medicine, Berry Genomics Co. Seek to Improve on Prenatal Genetic Tests

Published: Monday, January 07, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, January 07, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Teams aim to improve prenatal genetic testing by combining BCM’s expertise in using microarrays for DNA analysis and Berry’s non-invasive technology evaluating fetal DNA in maternal plasma.

BCM’s highly ranked genetics program, led by National Academy of Sciences member Dr. Arthur Beaudet, has been dedicated to providing the medical community with high-quality and comprehensive genetics testing services for over 30 years. BCM’s Medical Genetics Lab has pioneered the development and use of microarray technology for the testing of prenatal/pediatric genetic disorders for more than 50,000 cases.

The microarray testing uses a gene-chip to assess the make-up of chromosomes (organized structures of DNA and proteins that are found in cells) in a particular part of the human genome (genetic blue print). In areas of the genome, there are portions of the genetic material that show imbalances because they are duplicated or deleted abnormally with gains and losses of genetic information that may signal risk for a genetic disorder.

Berry Genomics has developed technologies to screen and test for genetic abnormalities of the fetus by evaluating fetal DNA in maternal plasma. This technology avoids invasive prenatal diagnostic procedures of chorionic villus sampling, which requires samples being taken from the placenta, and/or amniocentesis, where samples are taken from the amniotic sac around the developing fetus.

These procedures have been a source of anxiety and apprehension for expectant mothers, Beaudet said.

"We are committed to improving the diagnostic sensitivity of invasive prenatal testing as exemplified by our participation in a recently published collaborative National Institutes of Health-funded study," said Dr. Arthur Beaudet, chair and professor of molecular and human genetics at BCM. "We are conducting research to enable non-invasive prenatal testing to detect all the conditions currently detected by invasive testing. It is an honor and a privilege to participate in this international collaboration."

"We are very pleased to enter this agreement with Baylor College of Medicine," said Dr. Daixing Zhou, CEO of Berry Genomics. "Non-invasive prenatal testing and microarray technology are rapidly changing the way we detect genetic diseases. By collaborating with Baylor College of Medicine, we are now able to offer the complete solutions for prenatal screening and diagnosis."

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Baylor, DNAnexus Collaborate
Partnership sets out to develop HgV, a new iteration of HGSC's Mercury, a BCM-developed data processing and variant calling pipeline for analyzing and annotating next-generation sequencing data in research and clinical contexts.
Tuesday, June 23, 2015
Baylor, TGen Collaborate on Personalized Cancer Treatment Options
The companies will collaborate on precision medicine for cancer patients by offering liquid biopsies, performing gene sequencing, conducting clinical trials, and creating personalized vaccines.
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
Role of Cancer Stem Cells in Chemo-Resistance
'Wound response' of cancer stem cells may explain chemo-resistance in bladder cancer.
Friday, December 05, 2014
Massimo Pietropaolo Named McNair Scholar at Baylor
World renowned physician-scientist in type 1 diabetes research, Dr. Massimo Pietropaolo, has been named McNair Scholar at Baylor College of Medicine.
Wednesday, October 29, 2014
Clinical Integration of NGS
Experts provide much-needed policy analysis for clinical integration of next generation sequencing.
Tuesday, September 23, 2014
Collaboration Unravels Novel Mechanism for Neurological Disorder
The novel gene (CLP1) associated with a neurological disorder affecting both the peripheral and central nervous systems.
Saturday, April 26, 2014
$3M NIH Grant Enables Baylor International HIV/AIDS Program
Researchers to study genetic differences of disease in sub-Saharan African children.
Wednesday, February 19, 2014
Microarray Analysis Improves Prenatal Diagnosis
A "chip" or array that can quickly detect disorders such as Down syndrome, or other diseases associated with chromosomal abnormalities, has proved an effective tool in prenatal diagnosis in 300 cases, as reported by Baylor College of Medicine.
Tuesday, November 29, 2011
Experimental Drug Targets Chemo-Resistant Breast Cancer Stem Cells
The cells that remain after treatment that could potentially refuel tumor growth, researchers say.
Monday, December 14, 2009
Protein 'Tubules' Free Avian Flu Virus from Immune Recognition
Two domains or portions of the protein NS1 combine to form tiny tubules where double-stranded RNA is hidden from the immune system, researchers say.
Friday, November 07, 2008
High Throughput Imaging Speeds Analysis of Hormone Receptors
A new high throughput microscopy technique enabled researchers at Baylor College of Medicine to analyze thousands of individual cells expressing androgen receptor.
Monday, November 03, 2008
Lack of Fragile X, Related Gene Disrupts Sleep
Deficiency of the FMR1 gene and a similar gene called FXR2 could account for sleep problems associated with inherited mental impairment.
Friday, June 27, 2008
Ronin Provides Alternate Pathway to Pristine Embryonic Stem Cells
The protein Ronin maintains embryonic stem cells in their undifferentiated state and plays roles in genesis of embryos and their development, researchers say.
Friday, June 27, 2008
Nature Mixes, Matches Genes to Keep Nerve Cells Straight
BCM researchers report that nature has to mix and match thousands of genes to generate the myriad types of neurons needed to assemble the brain and nervous system.
Thursday, June 12, 2008
Findings Indicate How Gene Transcription is Controlled in Embryonic Stem Cells
In a report that appears in the journal Nature Cell Biology, BCM researchers explain that association determines fate in embryonic stem cells.
Monday, May 05, 2008
Scientific News
High Throughput Mass Spectrometry-Based Screening Assay Trends
Dr John Comley provides an insight into HT MS-based screening with a focus on future user requirements and preferences.
Kitchen Utensils Can Spread Bacteria Between Foods
In a recent study researchers found that produce that contained bacteria would contaminate other produce items through the continued use of knives or graters—the bacteria would latch on to the utensils commonly found in consumers' homes and spread to the next item.
Exploring the Causes of Cancer
Queen's research to understand the regulation of a cell surface protein involved in cancer.
Safer, Faster Way To Remove Pollutants From Water
Using nanoparticles filled with enzymes proves more effective than current methods.
Drug May Prevent Life-Threatening Muscle Loss in Advanced Cancers
New data describes how an experimental drug can stop life-threatening muscle wasting (cachexia) associated with advanced cancers and restore muscle health.
Ancient Viral Molecules Essential for Human Development
Genetic material from ancient viral infections is critical to human development, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
Novel Tumor Treatment
In the first published results from a $386,000 National Cancer Institute grant awarded earlier this year, a paper by Scott Verbridge and Rafael Davalos has been published.
Speeding Up the Process of Making Vaccines
System uses a freeze-dry concept to develop "just-add-water" solution.
Chemical Design Made Easier
Rice University scientists prepare elusive organocatalysts for drug and fine chemical synthesis.
New Analysis Technique for Chiral Activity in Molecules
Professor Hyunwoo Kim of the Chemistry Department and his research team have developed a technique that can easily analyze the optical activity of charged compounds by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos