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BioChemics Awarded Patent for Development of Bifunctional Synthetic Molecules

Published: Thursday, January 31, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, January 31, 2013
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A novel drug delivery and efficacy enhancement technology.

BioChemics announced today that it has received a patent for a new breakthrough drug delivery technology. This technology called Bifunctional Synthetic Molecule, or BSM, involves covalently bonding two existing different molecules together to create a unique, new and chemically-stable molecule which contains desired physicochemical properties for the purpose of enhanced dermal, or other tissue, penetration. BSM also provides co-localization of the different components of the new molecule in the target tissue at the same time, further enhancing efficacy of the drug.

These new molecules allow BioChemics to create new chemical entities (NCE’s) with bifunctional characteristics that are, in some examples, designed to have superior tissue penetration properties and tissue targeting properties. In other examples, the BSM is designed to have a covalent bond that is both tissue-specific and enzyme-labile that releases the different functionalities of the BSM once it is deposited at the target tissue. The multiple functionalities, impacting the target tissue simultaneously, boosts efficacy and enhances disease therapy. We believe that this technology gives BioChemics the potential to re-engineer many existing drugs creating new classes of pharmaceutical agents that have an enhanced efficacy, enhanced pharmacology, and improved safety profiles. The BSM technology is designed to enhance the delivery of drugs and to improve the therapeutic index of the drug by promoting the optimal tissue distribution for maximum therapeutic impact.

“I am excited that we have been awarded this new technology,” said John Masiz, President of BioChemics Inc. “This technology may allow us to create ‘smart drugs’ that have the ability to find the specific diseased tissue target in the body and then concentrate the active drug into that specific tissue for a better therapeutic event. Further, this technology may minimize side effects since non-targeted tissue will not be impacted. This new system continues to build on BioChemics’ predecessor VALE technology and further confirms that advances in drug delivery will be the major source of pharmaceutical advancement over the next decade.”


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