Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Biomarker Discovery Center Receives Grant to Develop Diagnostic Blood Test

Published: Thursday, January 31, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, January 31, 2013
Bookmark and Share
The $799,800 grant from the Osteopathic Heritage Foundation to develop is for a blood test that can diagnose mild cognitive impairment (MCI) caused by early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

MCI affects nearly one in every five adults older than 65, causing memory and language problems beyond those associated with normal aging. Individuals with MCI often exhibit early symptoms of dementia, and approximately 60 percent of all MCI cases are believed to be early-stage Alzheimer’s disease.

The grant from the Osteopathic Heritage Foundation will help expand earlier research conducted by Robert Nagele, PhD, the director of the Biomarker Discovery Center. Dr. Nagele’s published research includes recent findings that identify specific autoantibody biomarkers in the blood that can potentially be used to diagnose early stages of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.

“Using our novel biomarker discovery strategy, we have shown that it is possible to use a single drop of blood to diagnose Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s with greater than 95 percent accuracy,” said Nagele. “This same approach should also allow us to identify a small number of biomarkers that can also accurately diagnose MCI caused by early-stage Alzheimer’s disease.”

The funded project will pursue three specific goals: identify a small number of autoantibody biomarkers that can accurately (90 percent or higher) diagnose MCI cases caused by early stage Alzheimer’s disease; verify the accuracy rate with a larger scale study; and construct and test a diagnostic kit that is maximally accurate for the broadest possible MCI patient population. If successful, the study will then take the steps needed for final Food and Drug Administration approval of the test.

Current approaches to MCI diagnosis rely on physical, neurological and psychiatric examinations, laboratory tests, and a thorough review of the patient’s medications and medical history. Recently, great attention has been given to using neuroimaging technologies to detect structural changes in the brain before symptoms appear. However, these approaches require expensive equipment and technology and can require hospital visits, the injection of radioactive compounds and the availability of radiologists with advanced training in these techniques.

“A relatively non-invasive test such as ours would allow for early detection of Alzheimer’s-driven MCI, which could lead to beneficial lifestyle changes and improved quality of life, and allow for patients and their families to plan for the future,” Nagele said. “It will also enable physicians to distinguish Alzheimer’s-driven MCI from that caused by other treatable conditions, such as drug reactions, depression or changes to the brain’s supply of blood or oxygen.”

While current treatments for Alzheimer’s cannot stop the progression of the disease, several medications are capable of significantly enhancing brain performance and alleviating symptoms. A number of promising drugs are also currently under development and in clinical trials for the treatment of early Alzheimer’s disease. An easy-to-administer blood test for MCI would give pharmaceutical companies a way to identify patients for clinical trials who are at a very early stage of their disease and give researchers a nearly immediate way to monitor the effectiveness of medications under examination.

The UMDNJ-School of Osteopathic Medicine, the New Jersey Health Foundation, and Durin Technologies, Inc., a biotechnology company with expertise in protein microarray technology, will provide additional support and in-kind contributions of staff, equipment and supplies directly related to this study.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,000+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,400+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

You Don't "Own" Your Own Genes
Researchers raise alarm about loss of individual "genomic liberty" due to gene patents that may impact the era of personalized medicine.
Thursday, March 28, 2013
Scientific News
Releasing Cancer Cells for Better Analysis
A new device developed at the University of Michigan could provide a non-invasive way to monitor the progress of an advanced cancer treatment.
Releasing Cancer Cells for Better Analysis
A new device developed at the University of Michigan could provide a non-invasive way to monitor the progress of an advanced cancer treatment.
Apricot Kernels Pose Risk of Cyanide Poisoning
Eating more than three small raw apricot kernels, or less than half of one large kernel, in a serving can exceed safe levels. Toddlers consuming even one small apricot kernel risk being over the safe level.
Cell Transplant Treats Parkinson’s in Mice
A University of Wisconsin—Madison neuroscientist has inserted a genetic switch into nerve cells so a patient can alter their activity by taking designer drugs that would not affect any other cell.
Understanding Female HIV Transmission
Glowing virus maps points of entry through entire female reproductive tract for first time.
Genetic Markers Influence Addiction
Differences in vulnerability to cocaine addiction and relapse linked to both inherited traits and epigenetics, U-M researchers find.
Lab-on-a-Chip for Detecting Glucose
By integrating microfluidic chips with fiber optic biosensors, researchers in China are creating ultrasensitive lab-on-a-chip devices to detect glucose levels.
A lncRNA Regulates Repair of DNA Breaks in Breast Cancer Cells
Findings give "new insight" into biology of tough-to-treat breast cancer.
COPD Linked to Increased Bacterial Invasion
Persistent inflammation in COPD may result from a defect in the immune system that allows airway bacteria to invade deeper into the lung.
Detection of HPV in First-Void Urine
Similar sensitivity of HPV test on first void urine sample compared to cervical smear.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,400+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!