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Dyax Corp. and Novellus Biopharma AG Announce Partnership to Develop and Commercialize HAE Drug in Latin America

Published: Monday, February 04, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, February 04, 2013
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KALBITOR is marketed in United States for the treatment of acute attacks of HAE in patients 16 years of age and older.

Under the terms of the exclusive license agreement, Dyax will receive an upfront payment and is eligible to receive future sales milestones. Dyax is also eligible to receive royalties on net product sales. Novellus is solely responsible for all costs associated with necessary development, regulatory activities, and the commercialization of KALBITOR in the covered territories. Additionally, Novellus will purchase drug product from Dyax on a cost-plus basis for commercial supply.

"We are pleased to announce a new partnership for KALBITOR in Latin America, and look forward to working with Novellus toward its commercialization in this region," said Gustav Christensen, President and Chief Executive Officer of Dyax Corp. "Novellus' experience in bringing novel biotherapeutics to market will be important in delivering KALBITOR to HAE patients in this region. We continue to make strides in expanding the availability of KALBITOR and delivering an acute HAE treatment to patients in need around the globe."

"Based on the clinical and commercial success of KALBITOR as an acute treatment for HAE in the United States, we are excited to bring this important therapeutic to the Latin American market," commented David Muñoz Guzman, Chief Executive Officer of Novellus. "We believe there is a great opportunity in Latin America to provide solutions for the management of HAE and we look forward to working with Dyax to bring KALBITOR to these markets."


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