Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Clasado Announces Positive Results of Clinical Study of Bimuno® for Metabolic Syndrome

Published: Friday, February 15, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, February 15, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Results will be published in the March 2013 issue of The Journal of Nutrition.

Clasado has announced the results of a clinical study on the use of the Bimuno (B-GOS) to alter bacteria in the human gastrointestinal tract as a candidate to help prevent and manage Metabolic Syndrome. The results from the study will be published in the March 2013 issue of The Journal of Nutrition.

The double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study has been conducted on behalf of Clasado by a research team led by Dr. Jelena Vulevic, School of Food Biosciences, University of Reading, UK.

The trial tested the effect of consuming the trans-galactooligosaccharide mixture Bimuno (a prebiotic used by human gastrointestinal microbes), altering which bacteria reside in the gastrointestinal tract, and its effects on Metabolic Syndrome. This is the first time such effects using a non-digestible oligosaccharide have been reported.

The Bimuno research is part of an on-going program by Clasado in collaboration with the University of Reading’s Food Microbial Sciences Unit and other globally recognized research institutes.

The research programmes and collaboration started in 2000 to provide understanding of the link between microbiota and various aspects of human health. Bimuno is a unique patent protected second generation prebiotic.

Metabolic Syndrome refers to the group of health conditions that includes high blood sugar, hypertension and central adiposity. These tend to occur together and increase the likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and some forms of cancers.

Various research has shown that Metabolic Syndrome affects up to 25% of the population of the US and UK. The chances of developing Metabolic Syndrome is increased by obesity, high stress lifestyles, and a high fat / sugar, low mineral / vitamin diet. There is no existing therapy. Weight reduction, moderate-intensity exercise, and smoking cessation are often the only treatment.

The study demonstrated that Bimuno - GOS positively affected the gut microbiota by increasing the number of positive bifidobacteria, whilst reducing more negative bacteria. Positive effects were seen as early as 6 weeks.

There was also a positive effect on immune responses by increasing faecal sIgA (marker of mucosal immunity), and decreasing calprotectin and CRP (markers of inflammation). Additionally insulin, total cholesterol, triglycerides and TC/HDL ratio (markers of metabolic syndrome) was reduced.

It was concluded by the team that the addition of Bimuno to the diet of individuals who are at risk of developing, or already have, Metabolic Syndrome could contribute to enhancing their gastrointestinal health, immune function and reduce some of the risk factors While efforts to improve the diet and increase exercise in at risk individuals should continue to be the primary advice, these findings may have implications for those that either cannot, or will not, change their dietary habits or lifestyle significantly.

“Poor diet and inactive lifestyles in the western world continue to increase the prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome, already affecting 25% of those in the US and UK, and resulting in cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancers,” said Geoff Collins, Head of Consumer Marketing, Clasado.

Collins continued, “It is critical to understand how modifying the gut microbiota and immune system can affect this. We are delighted that Clasado’s Bimuno might be able to contribute to combating Metabolic Syndrome.”

The research team will continue to work with Bimuno, and will run further clinical trials with diabetics and overweight adults.

“There has been little conclusive research so far into the biological mechanisms causing Metabolic Syndrome, given the diversity and size of the human microbiome,” said Dr. Jelena Vulevic, School of Food Biosciences, University of Reading, UK.

Dr. Vulevic continued, “Greater understanding of these areas will contribute towards providing personalized nutrition that includes functional food ingredients targeting the microbiota. This will help prevent or delay the development of many current disorders such as metabolic syndrome, functional gut disorders or stress related disorders.”


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 5,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Clasado and University of Oxford Demonstrate Effect of Prebiotics on Brain and Gut
Study results provide positive data for ongoing human trials.
Monday, January 27, 2014
Scientific News
Point of Care Diagnostics - A Cautious Revolution
Advances in molecular biology, coupled with the miniaturization and improved sensitivity of assays and devices in general, have enabled a new wave of point-of-care (POC) or “bedside” diagnostics.
Mass Spec Technology Drives Innovation Across the Biopharma Workflow
With greater resolving power, analytical speed, and accuracy, new mass spectrometry technology and techniques are infiltrating the biopharmaceuticals workflow.
One Step Closer to Precision Medicine for Chronic Lung Disease Sufferers
A study led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and National Jewish Health, has provided evidence of links between SNPs and known COPD blood protein biomarkers.
Scientists Find Lethal Vulnerability in Treatment-Resistant Lung Cancer
The study describes how the drug Selinexor killed lung cancer cells and shrank tumors in mice when used against cancers driven by the aggressive and difficult-to-treat KRAS cancer gene.
Drug to Treat Alcohol Use Disorder Shows Promise Among Drinkers With High Stress
The findings suggest that potential future studies with drugs targeting vasopressin blockade should focus on populations of people with AUD who also report high levels of stress.
C Dots Show Powerful Tumor Killing Effect
Nanoparticles known as Cornell dots, or C dots, have shown great promise as a therapeutic tool in the detection and treatment of cancer.
New Imaging Technique in Alzheimer’s Disease
Study confirms new imaging technique corresponds a higher degree of actual brain changes.
ReadCoor Launched to Commercialize 3D Sequencing Tech
ReadCoor will leverage the Wyss Institute’s method for simultaneously sequencing and mapping RNAs within cells and tissues to advance development of diagnostics.
NCI Collaborates with Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
NCI collaborates with MMRF to incorporate genomic and clinical data into NCI Genomic Data Commons database.
Ancient Eggshell Protein Breaks Through DNA Time Barrier
Fossil proteins from a 3.8million year-old eggshell have been identifed, suggests proteins could give insight into evolutionary tree.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,000+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!