Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Overcoming Heart Failure, a European Challenge

Published: Thursday, February 21, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, February 21, 2013
Bookmark and Share
The HOMAGE project aims to identify and validate specific biomarkers of heart failure in order to prevent the development of the disease affecting elderly population.

The HOMAGE (Heart OMics in AGEing) project, coordinated by the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), has been awarded a grant by the European Commission for a 6 year period. 

17 research groups from 10 countries will collaborate to investigate new ways of preventing heart failure. The project will use an innovative ‘omic-based’ approach which investigating simultaneously a huge amount of genes, proteins and metabolites. The 17 partners will meet at Nancy on February 22nd for the kick off meeting of HOMAGE. 

Professor Faiez Zannad, Head of the Centre d’Investigation Clinique Pierre Drouin Inserm U9501 and Inserm Unit 1116 based in Nancy, is the project coordinator. The 12 million euros grant of the European Commission will be dedicated to the HOMAGE consortium for research on heart failure, a serious illness altering myocardial activity which affects more than 6.5 million persons in Europe. Indeed, the prevalence of heart failure is increasing worldwide due to an ageing population as well as a rising trend of risk factors for heart disease such as diabetes, obesity and hypertension. Heart failure is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the world and remains the most frequent cause of hospitalization for patients over 65 years old. The costs related to heart failure have been estimated around 1.5 billion euros per year in France. 

Despite important progress in the treatment including new drugs, new medical devices and innovative disease management programmes, the diagnosis of heart failure is often difficult in older adults with co-morbidities. Screening tests are usually based on blood pressure, glycaemic and cholesterol control. Although they are useful to detect high risk patients, they are limited regarding their sensitivity and specificity. During the past decade, promising biomarkers such as natriuretic peptides have been identified to diagnose heart failure, but their predictive value remains relatively poor. The HOMAGE consortium is willing to validate more specific and more sensitive biomarkers which should facilitate an early detection of the disease in patients at risk. 

To achieve this goal, the consortium agreed on the use of an ‘omic-based’ approach. This approach aims to validate promising biomarker candidates by crossing a large volume of data (genomics, proteomics, miRNomics, transcriptomics and metabolomics). This would permit scientists to understand new pathophysiological mechanisms, signaling pathways and identify new therapeutic targets to prevent heart failure. 

The HOMAGE consortium will manage cohorts for a total of 30 000 patients. The European researchers will firstly identify biomarker candidates in blood and study their predictive value for heart failure and common co-morbidities associated with ageing (renal impairment, cognitive disorders…). Subsequently, HOMAGE will lead a clinical trial to look for novel treatments of heart failure that can be targeted specifically to those patients at risk. This trial  will allow identifying patients’ omics based biomarker profiles most likely to predict response to treatment with the better benefit/risk ratio, an attempt into personalized medicine.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,900+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,200+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
Retractable Protein Nanoneedles
The ability to control the transfer of molecules through cellular membranes is an important function in synthetic biology; a new study from researchers at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and Harvard Medical School (HMS) introduces a novel mechanical method for controlling release of molecules inside cells.
Leukemia’s Surroundings Key to its Growth
Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered that a type of cancer found primarily in children can grow only when signaled to do so by other nearby cells that are noncancerous.
Common Cell Transformed into Master Heart Cell
By genetically reprogramming the most common type of cell in mammalian connective tissue, researchers at the University of Wisconsin—Madison have generated master heart cells — primitive progenitors that form the developing heart.
‘Smelling’ Prostate Cancer
A research team from the University of Liverpool and the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) has reached an important milestone towards creating a urine diagnostic test for prostate cancer that could mean that invasive diagnostic procedures that men currently undergo eventually become a thing of the past.
Genetic Mutation that Prevents Diabetes Complications
The most significant complications of diabetes include diabetic retinal disease, or retinopathy, and diabetic kidney disease, or nephropathy. Both involve damaged capillaries.
A Crystal Clear View of Biomolecules
Fundamental discovery triggers paradigm shift in crystallography.
Could the Food we Eat Affect Our Genes?
Almost all of our genes may be influenced by the food we eat, according to new research.
Criminal Justice Alcohol Program Linked to Decreased Mortality
Institute has announced that in the criminal justice alcohol program deaths dropped by 4.2 percent over six years.
Charting Kidney Cancer Metabolism
Changes in cell metabolism are increasingly recognized as an important way tumors develop and progress, yet these changes are hard to measure and interpret. A new tool designed by MSK scientists allows users to identify metabolic changes in kidney cancer tumors that may one day be targets for therapy.
Improving Regenerative Medicine
Lab-created stem cells may lack key characteristics, UCLA research finds.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,900+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,200+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!