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New 24-well RAFT Kit for Realistic 3D Cell Culture Models for Toxicology Research

Published: Friday, March 08, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, March 08, 2013
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Come and see this versatile 3D cell culture method on TAP’s Booth #1159 at SOT.

TAP Biosystems will be unveiling its latest development in 3D cell culture, the RAFT™ 24 well Kit on Booth #1159 at the Society of Toxicology (SOT) Meeting.

The kit can produce realistic, reproducible single or multiple 3D cell cultures in physiologically relevant collagen scaffolds and could improve the results of a range of cell based assay models including those suitable for in-vitro toxicology models.

The new RAFT 24-well kit has been developed in response to researchers’ requests for a 24-well format to generate single or multiple collagen-based 3D cell culture models, ready for in-vitro toxicology research.

The kit is packaged individually to give ultimate flexibility in producing the number of cultures required, without any wastage of consumables or reagents.

The new kit leverages the novel RAFT collagen-based process and works with specially-developed reagents and a plate heater to generate 3D cell cultures using a simple protocol, in less than an hour.

The 24-well kit is the latest addition to the RAFT 3D cell culture portfolio that includes an automation-friendly 96-well version, as well as a kit for 3D cell culture using inserts, enabling researchers to use the RAFT system in a range of therapeutics areas for cell-based screening, modelling and research.

On the booth, TAP’s staff will demonstrate how scientists simply mix the reagents from the RAFT kit with their choice of cells at the desired cell seeding densities, pipette into their preferred type of 24 well plates (Corning, Greiner Bio-One, Millipore and Nunc plates are compatible) and incubate for 15 minutes at 37oC to form a cell-seeded collagen hydrogel.

The RAFT absorbers are placed manually onto the hydrogels, and in just 15 minutes the medium is wicked gently into the absorbers, leaving cells encapsulated in physiological strength collagen.

This 3D cell culture is then suitable for use in in-vitro cell-based assays using analytical techniques such as cell proliferation and immunofluorescent imaging.


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