Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Communities
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Brooks Showcases Mass Flow Controllers, Capacitance Manometers and Pressure Products at Pittcon 2013

Published: Monday, March 11, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, March 11, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Schedule a product demo to receive Brooks’ USB giveaway at Booth 702.

Brooks Instrument will exhibit its mass flow controllers, vacuum capacitance manometers and pressure transmitters at Pittcon 2013, March 17-21, Philadelphia.

Brooks will show the latest technology advancements for its GF40/80 Series mass flow controllers, Xactorr vacuum capacitance manometers and SolidSense II pressure transducers at Booth 702 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

At Pittcon, Brooks will demo its GF 80 mass flow controller, part of its expanded GF 40/80 Series portfolio, which now features an increased flow rate up to 50 slpm.

The GF 40 is now equipped with a “normally open” valve typically used to maintain purge gas flow in the event of a power interruption.

The GF 80 now features a Teflon valve seat, allowing it to be used on all gases, including corrosive and reactive gases. Additionally, the GF 40/80 Series has expanded RS485 communication protocols, making it an ideal upgrade for users of Aera (Hitachi), Celerity, Tylan, Mykrolis, Millipore and Unit mass flow controllers.

These users will experience the benefits of better actual process gas accuracy and repeatability from their mass flow controller while keeping their same communication protocol.

The GF 40/80 Series leads the market in long-term zero stability at less than 0.5% per year. This specification means the device will return more reliable accuracy data for a longer period of time than competitive devices.

It gives the user greater confidence in the numbers reported, and reduces the time and cost associated with recalibrations. The GF 40/80 Series is also available with Brooks’ patented MultiFlo™, a powerful technology that enables users to re-program the gas and/or range of the device in minutes without the trouble and cost of removing the mass flow controller from service.

Brooks will also display the XacTorr vacuum capacitance manometers, which are premium, heated gauges that use patented, dual-zone heating to ensure 0.1°C temperature uniformity.

With its patented Mark-IV sensor, the XacTorr lasts up to three times longer than competitive capacitance manometers. Unique sensor design allows the XacTorr to recover from large changes in pressure faster than other vacuum gauges on the market, significantly decreasing downtime.

It also has unique diagnostic features for preventative maintenance such as tracking remaining zero adjustment range to allow scheduled maintenance, which reduces unplanned interruptions.

The XacTorr gauges include an RS-485 dataport that enables in-situ monitoring and troubleshooting without interfering with the tool communication system.

Brooks’ SolidSense II pressure transducers are designed for stable, accurate and reliable pressure monitoring in a wide range of applications, including hazardous area and corrosive gas environments.

The ultra-stable, micro-machined silicon strain gauges are matched and fused at high temperature to the metal diaphragm to relieve manufacturing-induced stress.

The process reduces “drift” commonly associated with other pressure transducers. Downtime for zero adjustment to compensate for “drift” is exponentially reduced.

The SolidSense II sensor is a single-machined piece of SEMI F19 material, eliminating diaphragm welds and dissimilar materials, the primary sources of hydrogen embrittlement.

Pittcon attendees who register for a demo of any of Brooks product at the show will receive a 4GB Brooks GF 40/80 USB drive.

Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 5,200+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Scientific News
How it Works: Advanced Data Analysis Using Visualization
Visualisation of data can be used to help molecular biologists tackle the vast datasets their experiments create.
Unravelling the Role of Key Genes and DNA Methylation in Blood Cell Malignancies
Researchers from the University of Nebraska Medical Center have demonstrated the role of Dnmt3a in safeguarding normal haematopoiesis.
Salford Lung Study - The First Real World Clinical Trial
In this podcast, we learn about the Salford Lung Study and its potential to revolutionize the way we assess new drugs and treatments around the world.
Point of Care Diagnostics - A Cautious Revolution
Advances in molecular biology, coupled with the miniaturization and improved sensitivity of assays and devices in general, have enabled a new wave of point-of-care (POC) or “bedside” diagnostics.
Epigenetics and Neural Cell Death
Researchers demonstrate how deregulation of an epigenetic mechanism active in early neurogenesis phases triggers neural cell death.
Ebola-Affected Countries Receive NIH Support
The National Institutes of Health has established a new program to further research capacity to study Ebola and other epidemics.
Immunotherapy Technique Holds Promise for Curing Food Allergies
Scientists develop immunotherapy technique that almost eliminating allergic response and anaphylactic response in food-allergic mice.
Skin Patch to Treat Peanut Allergy
NIH-funded study suggests peanut protein patch is a safe and convenient method of treatment.
Molecular Origins of Dust Mite Allergy Discovered
Scientists have identified molecules of house dust mites that are targeted by the immune system of children, developing allergic rhinitis and asthma.
Antibodies from Ebola Survivors Neutralize Virus, Protect Lab Mice
Scientists discover antiboides generated from the blood of Ebola survivors can strongly combat the virus in the lab.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,200+ scientific videos