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The High Performance Artemis™ Raman Microscopectrometer from CRAIC Technologies

Published: Monday, March 25, 2013
Last Updated: Sunday, March 24, 2013
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Designed to add to many optical microscopes, the CRAIC Artemis™ can measure Raman spectra of micron-scale samples with unparalleled performance.

CRAIC Technologies has introduced the new Raman microspectroscopy: the CRAIC Artemis™ Raman microspectrometer.

Designed to be added to many different types of optical microscopes, the CRAIC Artemis™ offers very high sensitivity, high resolution, a broad spectral range and a rapid sampling times.

This instrument enables scientists and engineers to measure the Raman spectra from microscopic samples or microscope sampling areas of large samples, such as semiconductors.

The CRAIC Artemis™ can also be added to a CRAIC Technologies microspectrophotometer to add Raman to UV-visible-NIR absorbance, reflectance and fluorescence microspectroscopy and imaging.

The cutting edge technology of the CRAIC Helios™ means that a whole host of capabilities are now available to researchers and engineers.

With the introduction of the CRAIC Artemis™ Raman spectrometer, CRAIC Technologies is proud to offer users an even more powerful tool for sample micro-analysis.

“CRAIC Technologies has been an innovator in the field of UV-visible-NIR microanalysis since its founding. We have helped to advance the field of microscale analysis with innovative instrumentation, software, research and teaching. We have seen the need for Raman microspectroscopy in addition to our current capabilities of UV-visible-NIR and luminescence microspectroscopy. Therefore, we created the CRAIC Artemis™ Raman microspectrometer to add to our current instruments” states Dr. Paul Martin, President of CRAIC Technologies.

Dr. Martin continued, “By incorporating Raman spectroscopy with our UV-visible microspectrophotometers, the customer no longer has purchase a separate instrument, nor move the sample between instruments and acquire the data separately. You can simply analyze the same microscopic area of the sample under the same conditions without additional sample preparation or instrument alignment. Laboratory efficiency and sample analysis throughput can therefore be dramatically increased.”

The CRAIC Artemis™ Raman spectrometer is a self contained unit that features an the latest in long-lived laser technology, an advanced optical interface to the microscope, a truly unique Raman spectrometer and advanced software for instrument control and data analysis.

Different units are designed for use with different wavelength lasers and all offer extremely high sensitivity, high resolution, a broad spectral range and fast scan times.

The idea is to have a powerful, easy-to-use Raman microspectrometer to enhance users spectroscopic results. These rugged, self-contained units are designed to be used either with an optical microscope or with a CRAIC Technologies microspectrophotometer.

With high sensitivity, high spectral resolution, a broad spectral range, a durable design, ease-of-use, and the support of CRAIC Technologies, the CRAIC Artemis™ is more than just a Raman microspectrometer...it is the future of Raman spectroscopy.


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