Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Communities
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

High Level of Antibodies Linked to Cognitive Decline

Published: Thursday, March 28, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, March 28, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Researchers found that people with high levels of antibodies to five common infections in their blood, previously shown to be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, also are associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline.

The researchers used a test called infectious burden (IB) on blood samples from 1,625 participants in the multi-ethnic Northern Manhattan Study; the average age of participants was 69. IB measures exposure to three viruses (herpes simplex types 1 and 2 and cytomegalovirus) and two bacteria (Chlamydia pneumonia and Helicobacter pylori).

The subjects were given a cognitive assessment, the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE). Those who had higher IB scores had a 25 percent higher risk of scoring more poorly on the MMSE.

“The link was strongest among women, those with lower socioeconomic status, and—most notably—those who did not exercise,” said lead author Mira Katan, MD, postdoctoral fellow at the Neurological Institute at Columbia University Medical Center.

As the population ages, clinicians will have an ever greater need for ways to determine risk of cognitive loss. The link between elevated IB and cognitive loss could provide one such tool.

“Infectious burden and cognitive decline” was published in the March 26, 2013, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

World’s First Therapeutic Venom Database
Open-source library describes nearly 43,000 effects on the human body.
Thursday, November 26, 2015
What Do Animal Viruses Have to Do with Human Health?
Simon Anthony studies animal infections to prevent outbreaks in people.
Monday, September 28, 2015
Dentists Tapped for New Role: Drug Screenings
A visit to the dentist has the potential to be more than a checkup of our teeth as patients are increasingly screened for medical conditions like heart disease and diabetes.
Tuesday, August 18, 2015
Computer Model Forecasts Flu Outbreaks in Subtropical Climate
Study in Hong Kong predicts outbreaks by flu strains and is first to forecast flu in a subtropical climate.
Friday, August 07, 2015
Long-term Memories Are Maintained by Prion-like Proteins
Research from Eric Kandel’s lab at Columbia University Medical Center has uncovered evidence of a system in the brain that persistently maintains memories for long periods of time.
Friday, July 03, 2015
Scientists are Designing Decoy Drugs to Fool Cancer
Study shows potential of drugs that can target the Notch switch with reduced toxicity.
Thursday, May 28, 2015
DNA Abnormalities Found in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease
Routine genetic screening of children with CKD could lead to earlier, more precise diagnoses.
Tuesday, April 21, 2015
Patient-Specific Stem Cells and Personalized Gene Therapy
Patients’ own cells transformed into model for studying disease and developing potential treatment.
Saturday, July 12, 2014
Chips that Listen to Bacteria
Researchers have developed a chip that enables them to electrochemically image the signaling molecules from colonies spatially and temporally.
Thursday, February 27, 2014
Study Shows Where Alzheimer’s Starts and How It Spreads
The findings could improve early detection of the disease, when drugs may be most effective.
Tuesday, December 24, 2013
Global Study Discovers Flurry of New Alzheimer’s Genes
An international study has uncovered 11 new genes that increase the chance of developing Alzheimer’s disease and provide new clues to ways of fighting it.
Wednesday, October 30, 2013
Test Could Identify Which Prostate Cancers Require Treatment
3-gene biomarker gauges tumor’s aggressiveness.
Thursday, September 12, 2013
Columbia Licenses Novel 3-D Organ and Tumor Segmentation Software to Varian Medical Systems
Allows for more precise and efficient planning and monitoring of cancer treatment.
Friday, May 17, 2013
Improper Protein Digestion in Neurons Identified as a Cause of Familial Parkinson’s
Researchers at CUMC and others have discovered how the most common genetic mutations in familial Parkinson’s disease damage brain cells.
Friday, March 08, 2013
Study Shows Why Leukemia Returns in Some Children
With sophisticated new DNA techniques, a team of researchers has found, for the first time, why many children with a type of leukemia suffer a relapse.
Thursday, February 28, 2013
Scientific News
High Throughput Mass Spectrometry-Based Screening Assay Trends
Dr John Comley provides an insight into HT MS-based screening with a focus on future user requirements and preferences.
Revolutionary Technologies Developed to Improve Outcomes for Lung Cancer Patients
Breath test to detect lung cancer brings oxygen directly to the wound.
NIH Supports New Studies to Find Alzheimer’s Biomarkers in Down Syndrome
Initiative will track dementia onset, progress in Down syndrome volunteers.
Dementia Linked to Deficient DNA Repair
Mutant forms of breast cancer factor 1 (BRCA1) are associated with breast and ovarian cancers but according to new findings, in the brain the normal BRCA1 gene product may also be linked to Alzheimer’s disease.
Using Drug-Susceptible Parasites to Fight Drug Resistance
Researchers at the University of Georgia have developed a model for evaluating a potential new strategy in the fight against drug-resistant diseases.
Boosting Breast Cancer Treatment
To more efficiently treat breast cancer, scientists have been researching molecules that selectively bind to cancer cells and deliver a substance that can kill the tumor cells, for several years.
New Gene Map Reveals Cancer’s Achilles’ Heel
Team of researchers switches off almost 18,000 genes
New Discovery Sheds Light on Disease Risk
Gaps between genes interact to influence the risk of acquiring disease.
How Cells ‘Climb’ to Build Fruit Fly Tracheas
Mipp1 protein helps cells sprout “fingers” for gripping.
Research Finding Could Lead to Targeted Therapies for IBD
Findings published online in Cell Reports.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos