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Quantitative and Qualitative Differences in Response to Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccines

Published: Tuesday, April 23, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, April 23, 2013
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NIAID-funded investigators develop interactive web applications to share data with peers.

Investigators at the Baylor Institute for Immunology Research in Dallas and the Benaroya Research Institute (BRI) in Seattle have used systems immunology and genome-wide profiling to characterize the immune responses elicited by two popular vaccines. They also developed interactive, web-based figures and data exploration tools to share their findings with the broader scientific community. This NIAID-funded work, described online in the April 18, 2013, issue of Immunity, not only provides new insights into how vaccines confer protective immunity, but also demonstrates the potential of web technologies in disseminating the large amounts of data generated by systems immunology research.

For the full study, please visit http://www.niaid.nih.gov/LabsAndResources/resources/bioinformatics/Pages/vaccImmResponses.aspx


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