Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

BIO to Use ViS Analytics to Streamline Pediatric Clinical Research

Published: Thursday, May 09, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, May 09, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Pediatric research is essential to study the effects of new therapeutics in children.

The Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) and the ViS Research Institute (ViS) announce a new initiative aimed at improving the efficiency of clinical development for pediatric therapeutics. BIO and its member companies will work with ViS to use its online analytics platform to evaluate global pediatric clinical research infrastructure, identify pediatric patient populations, and empower clinical research collaboration.

The U.S. FDA and European Medicines Agency require pediatric study plans before approval of new therapeutics. Drug developers have difficulty finding qualified sites that can recruit patients for pediatric trials.

“Leveraging big data sources such as ViS Analytics can help drug developers identify patients to enable streamlined enrollment and site selection, making it faster and easier to conduct pediatric clinical trials and, ultimately, deliver treatments and cures to children suffering from life threatening and debilitating diseases such as epilepsy, hepatitis and diabetes,” said BIO President and CEO Jim Greenwood. “By working with ViS Research Institute, BIO and our member companies will empower pediatric clinical research worldwide.”

BIO member companies, pediatric research centers, regulators and especially pediatric patients will benefit from this initiative, as it will reduce the barriers to global pediatric clinical research. New analytics on pediatric clinical research infrastructure and patient populations will be available in the coming months on ViS' collaborative analytics platform.

“Innovative research approaches are needed to improve success in these most challenging pediatric drug development programs with more timely access for these new drugs in children,” said Dr. Ron Portman, Chair of BIO’s Pediatrics Committee.

Approximately 60% of the disease burden for high priority conditions like schizophrenia, depression, malaria, and HIV/Aids, is borne by children, though only about 12% of clinical trials are pediatric, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

When a disease is indicated in pediatric populations, pediatric trials are required to assess whether a drug that is effective in adults will be effective in children, or require a different dose, and whether its safety profile is similar or different when given to children. Additionally, the medication must be provided in age appropriate formulations that are acceptable to children. Often, important pediatric research is abandoned for reasons of impracticality or impossibility, according to the Institute of Medicine.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,000+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,400+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

BIO Welcomes 2013 Renewable Fuel Standard Rules
The Renewable Fuel Standard continues to ensure that the U.S. fuel market will be open to advanced and cellulosic biofuels as producers ramp up production.
Monday, February 04, 2013
Scientific News
Releasing Cancer Cells for Better Analysis
A new device developed at the University of Michigan could provide a non-invasive way to monitor the progress of an advanced cancer treatment.
Releasing Cancer Cells for Better Analysis
A new device developed at the University of Michigan could provide a non-invasive way to monitor the progress of an advanced cancer treatment.
Apricot Kernels Pose Risk of Cyanide Poisoning
Eating more than three small raw apricot kernels, or less than half of one large kernel, in a serving can exceed safe levels. Toddlers consuming even one small apricot kernel risk being over the safe level.
Cell Transplant Treats Parkinson’s in Mice
A University of Wisconsin—Madison neuroscientist has inserted a genetic switch into nerve cells so a patient can alter their activity by taking designer drugs that would not affect any other cell.
Understanding Female HIV Transmission
Glowing virus maps points of entry through entire female reproductive tract for first time.
Genetic Markers Influence Addiction
Differences in vulnerability to cocaine addiction and relapse linked to both inherited traits and epigenetics, U-M researchers find.
Lab-on-a-Chip for Detecting Glucose
By integrating microfluidic chips with fiber optic biosensors, researchers in China are creating ultrasensitive lab-on-a-chip devices to detect glucose levels.
A lncRNA Regulates Repair of DNA Breaks in Breast Cancer Cells
Findings give "new insight" into biology of tough-to-treat breast cancer.
COPD Linked to Increased Bacterial Invasion
Persistent inflammation in COPD may result from a defect in the immune system that allows airway bacteria to invade deeper into the lung.
Detection of HPV in First-Void Urine
Similar sensitivity of HPV test on first void urine sample compared to cervical smear.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,400+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!