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Creabilis Announces Headline Results of its Phase 2b Trial of CT327

Published: Friday, May 10, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, May 10, 2013
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Clinically and statistically significant reduction of chronic pruritus (itch) seen in psoriasis patients.

Creabilis has announced headline results of its Phase 2b trial with its lead product, CT327, in psoriasis patients.

CT327 is a novel, topical, TrkA kinase inhibitor developed using Creabilis’ LSE (Low Systemic Exposure) technology that creates ‘topical-by-design’ drugs.

Chronic pruritus is a debilitating symptom of many dermatological diseases and has a significant impact on quality of life, including sleep.

It is the cardinal symptom in atopic dermatitis and a key symptom of psoriasis. No medicine is currently approved for chronic pruritus.

Patients receiving CT327 showed a statistically significant and clinically meaningful reduction in pruritus compared to blinded placebo vehicle.

Pruritus was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS), the accepted regulatory endpoint. The reduction from baseline in pruritus VAS reached 60% for CT327 compared to 20% for vehicle alone (p<0.05).

A clinically meaningful reduction in pruritus (VAS ≥ 20mm) was seen in up to 79% of patients for CT327 compared to 36% for vehicle alone (p<0.05). At baseline, 69% of patients reported at least moderate pruritus (VAS > 40mm).

An improvement was also seen in the CT327 treated groups versus vehicle in mPASI (modified Psoriasis Area and Severity Index) in all patients.

In patients with at least moderate pruritus at the start of the trial, significant reductions in mPASI were observed for CT327 compared to vehicle. There was no significant impact of any dose of CT327 on the IGA (Investigator Global Assessment) endpoint.

CT327 was safe and well tolerated with no site application reactions and no systemic exposure. Notably, patients on CT327 reported fewer adverse events and withdrawals due to pruritus than the vehicle treated patients.

Eliot Forster, CEO of Creabilis, said: “We are excited by the results seen in this Phase 2b trial. In particular, the benefits of CT327 in treating pruritus are very encouraging and take us closer to the market in an indication with no currently available treatments. We anticipate further clinical development activity, targeting pruritus, in the near term. CT327 will represent a breakthrough for patients and doctors alike, both of whom currently struggle to deal with this distressing condition.”

David Roblin, CMO of Creabilis, said: “Pruritus is a debilitating yet under-recognized symptom in psoriasis and in other dermatological and systemic diseases. It has a significant impact on patients’ quality of life and is currently poorly treated. There are no licensed products available, nor an established standard of care. There is a significant unmet need for a targeted treatment of chronic pruritus that combines efficacy with a good safety profile. In this study, up to 77% of CT327 treated patients had no or mild pruritus by the end of therapy. Combined with its outstanding safety profile, CT327 has the potential to provide a great benefit to patients.”


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