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Global Oil Traders Fuel Kineta’s Drug Pipeline

Published: Wednesday, May 22, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, May 22, 2013
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Kineta, Inc. and Hydra, LLC announced the completion of a major investment to add funding to Kineta’s clinical-stage drug programs.

The investment is directed at Kineta’s two lead drug programs - ShK-186, a novel immune-sparing targeted therapeutic focused on autoimmune diseases, and rOAS, a novel pan-viral therapeutic aimed at an array of high-priority contagious pathogens for which there are few effective therapies.

“We are genuinely impressed with Kineta’s leadership and laser-focus on delivering high-caliber R&D to larger global pharmaceutical companies. This is a nimble organization with a track record of development success. Kineta has created a unique, cost-efficient and rational way to move early-stage drug programs into human subjects with a focus on rapidly delivering liquidity. All of these factors went into our investment decision,” explained Jamie Browne, a managing director of Hydra, LLC.

Mr. Browne co-leads Hydra, LLC, along with Ken Backes. Hydra is comprised of 13 recently retired Glencore Ltd. traders. Each Hydra member has committed considerable capital to the new private equity partnership. Hydra is focused on diversified opportunities, including choosing to provide Kineta, Inc., significant funding to make major clinical advancements in two drug development programs.

“Kineta is very pleased to welcome Hydra as a major investor into our clinical-stage programs. This is a team of highly astute investors with broad appreciation for underlying market forces across economic sectors. Their investment is a tremendous vote of confidence for the Kineta model and will enable us to advance our clinical work for two very promising drug candidates,” said Kineta, Inc., President and CEO Charles Magness, Ph.D.

Kineta’s lead program, Shk-186, recently completed phase one studies, successfully positioning it for multiple development pathways for autoimmune diseases. Kineta’s second program, rOAS, is scheduled to enter first-in-human clinical trials later this year. Kineta’s pipeline also contains three additional drug and vaccine adjuvant programs; all have novel mechanisms of action and are aimed at large, global unmet medical needs. Kineta has raised more than $46M since 2008 through grants and private investment. Kineta’s chief business goal is to partner or license clinically validated assets that have achieved pre-specified development milestones to pharmaceutical companies for further clinical development.


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