Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

ATARiS Informatics Platform Hits the Jackpot

Published: Wednesday, May 22, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, May 22, 2013
Bookmark and Share
ATARiS is one of several tools developed at the Broad Institute to precisely tune in to the signals within noisy datasets.

Listening to data isn’t easy. Massive amounts of data are often messy and complicated. But somewhere within the cacophony, information can harmonize and produce the sweet sound of discovery – if you have the right tools with which to hear it.

ATARiS is one of several tools developed at the Broad Institute to precisely tune in to the signals within datasets. The original idea for ATARiS came about a few years ago when members of Jill Mesirov’s computational biology and bioinformatics group, Bill Hahn's cancer biology group, and the Broad RNAi Platform were trying to address a common problem from the world of RNAi research. RNAi – short for RNA interference – allows researchers to “turn off” a gene or decrease that gene’s activity. Ideally, every gene in the genome would be paired with an RNAi reagent that could turn it – and only it – off. Instead, most RNAi reagents also disrupt other genes (a frustrating phenomenon known as off-target effects). Without a way to easily isolate on-target effects, the power of RNAi wanes.

RNAi is a critical tool for many projects at the Broad and beyond, including Project Achilles. This project – a joint effort between researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad – seeks to pinpoint cancer’s most important weaknesses. To do so, researchers use RNAi to turn off genes in hundreds of cell lines. About 50,000 RNAi reagents have been used to target 11,000 of the 21,000 human genes (about five RNAi reagents for each of these genes) in order to see which genes are critical for cancer’s survival. These crucial genes could become the targets of drugs in the future.

“What we want to do is tune in on a specific target effect,” says Diane Shao, a graduate student in senior associate member Bill Hahn’s lab at the Broad Institute and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. However, while researchers can pick out an RNAi reagent that seems particularly adept at killing cancer cells, they can’t be entirely certain which of its effects – on-target or off-target – are bringing about the desired result.

ATARiS helps cut through the noise from the multitude of variables and values. The computational method looks for patterns across multiple samples, assessing the performance of individual RNAi reagents to target specific genes. This allows researchers to determine which gene – rather than which RNAi reagent – is most of interest.

“ATARiS makes RNAi data more accessible,” says Aviad Tsherniak, a computational biologist in Jill Mesirov’s lab at the Broad and the key architect of ATARiS. “It simplifies it and standardizes it, and it makes the data compatible with other kinds methods.”


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,200+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,600+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Broad Institute Launches Food Allergy Initiative
Food allergy science initiative will bring leading scientists together to pave way for development of diagnostics, therapeutics.
Friday, June 24, 2016
Shining A Light On Bladder Cancer
Researchers scrutinize patterns of mutations in bladder tumor genomes, gleaning insights into the roles of DNA repair and tobacco-related DNA damage.
Friday, May 06, 2016
A Cellular Symphony Responsible for Autoimmune Disease
Broad Institute researchers have used a novel approach to increase our understanding of the immune system as a whole.
Monday, November 30, 2015
Screen of Human Genome Reveals Set of Genes Essential for Cellular Viability
Using two complementary analytical approaches, scientists at Whitehead Institute and Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have for the first time identified the universe of genes in the human genome essential for the survival and proliferation of human cell lines or cultured human cells.
Monday, October 19, 2015
DARPA Awards $32 Million Contract to MIT, Broad Institute Foundry
A facility at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and MIT that aims to achieve the full potential of engineering biology has received a five-year, $32 million contract from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).
Monday, September 28, 2015
Diagnostics Breakthrough Brings Viral Sequencing to Doctors’ Toolkit
New screening tool produces up to 10,000-fold improvement in viral matches compared with traditional high-throughput methods.
Monday, September 28, 2015
Scientists Discover New System For Human Genome Editing
CRISPR-Cpf1 system could disrupt both scientific and commercial landscape.
Monday, September 28, 2015
Researchers Develop a New Means of Killing Harmful Bacteria
Engineered particles are capable of producing toxins that are deadly to targeted bacteria.
Friday, June 26, 2015
Broad Institute & Google Genomics Combine Bioinformatics and Computing Expertise
Both companies explore how to break down major technical barriers that increasingly hinder biomedical research.
Thursday, June 25, 2015
CRISP-Disp Leverages CRISPR-Cas9 to Deliver RNA Structures to Targets in the Genome
A team of researchers from the Broad Institute and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute has developed CRISP-Disp, a method that expands on the CRISPR-Cas9 system, allowing researchers to display multiple, large RNA structures on the Cas9 protein.
Wednesday, June 10, 2015
GTEx: Useful Expression For Cancer Research
GTEx Project has recently published several papers reporting on findings from its two-year pilot phase.
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
Single-cell Analysis Hits its Stride
Advances in technology and computational analysis enable scale and affordability, paving the way for translational studies.
Saturday, May 23, 2015
Highly Efficient New Cas9 for In Vivo Genome Editing
New finding is expected to expand therapeutic and experimental applications of CRISPR.
Tuesday, April 07, 2015
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and Bayer Healthcare Expand their Partnership
Collaboration to develop therapies for cardiovascular disease.
Thursday, April 02, 2015
In vivo CRISPR-Cas9 Screen Sheds Light On Cancer Metastasis And Tumor Evolution
Genome-scale study points to drivers of tumor evolution and metastasis, provides roadmap for future in vivo Cas9 screens.
Friday, March 06, 2015
Scientific News
Platelets are the Pathfinders for Leukocyte Extravasation During Inflammation
Findings from the study could help in the prevention and treatment of inflammatory pathologies.
ASMS 2016: Targeting Mass Spectrometry Tools for the Masses
The expanding application range of MS in life sciences, food, energy, and health sciences research was highlighted at this year's ASMS meeting in San Antonio, Texas.
Benchtop Automation Trends
Gain a better understanding of current interest in and future deployment of benchtop automated systems.
Dengue Virus Exposure May Amplify Zika Infection
Researchers at Imperial College London have found that the previous exposure to the dengue virus may increase the potency of Zika infection.
Gender Determination in Forensic Investigations
This study investigated the effectiveness of lip print analysis as a tool in gender determination.
Identifying Novel Types of Forensic Markers in Degraded DNA
Scientists have tried to verify the nucleosome protection hypothesis by discovering STRs within nucleosome core regions, using whole genome sequencing.
Proteins in Blood of Heart Disease Patients May Predict Adverse Events
Nine-protein test shown superior to conventional assessments of risk.
Higher Frequency of Huntington's Disease Mutations Discovered
University of Aberdeen study shows that the gene change that causes Huntington's disease is much more common than previously thought.
Starving Stem Cells May Enable Scientists To Build Better Blood Vessels
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine have uncovered how changes in metabolism of human embryonic stem cells help coax them to mature into specific cell types — and may improve their function in engineered organs or tissues.
Rates of Nonmedical Prescription Opioid Use Disorder Double in 10 Years
Researchers at NIH have found that the nonmedical use of prescription opioids has more than doubled among adults in the United States from 2001-2002 to 2012-2013.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,200+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,600+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!