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Syros Pharmaceuticals Appoints Eric R. Olson, Ph.D. as Chief Scientific Officer

Published: Thursday, May 23, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, May 23, 2013
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Dr. Olson’s extensive experience in personalized medicine will support Syros’ mission to lead in gene control.

Syros Pharmaceuticals announced that Eric R. Olson, Ph.D., has joined the company as its Chief Scientific Officer. Dr. Olson has over 25 years experience in the life sciences industry, most recently as Research Vice President for respiratory diseases at Vertex Pharmaceuticals. During his 12 years at Vertex he led research, development and commercial teams in bringing to patients the first cystic fibrosis (CF) treatment resulting from discovery of the CF gene.

“Eric is of the few people in the biopharma industry who have led programs from conception all the way through development and successful commercialization,” said Nancy Simonian, M.D., Syros’s Chief Executive Officer. “The combination of his deep scientific expertise, his understanding for translating science into drugs that actually help people, and his experience creating real value for shareholders is extraordinary. It fits perfectly with Syros' mission.”

In addition to his work at Vertex Pharmaceuticals, Dr. Olson has also held positions as the Director of the Antibacterials and Molecular Sciences departments at Warner-Lambert (now Pfizer), as well as a research scientist focused on gene expression systems with The Upjohn Company. Dr. Olson earned his B.S. in microbiology from the University of Minnesota and a Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology from the University of Michigan. He is published in over 40 academic journals.

“Syros Pharmaceuticals’ groundbreaking work in gene control and Super-Enhancers has created a unique, state-of-the-art opportunity to develop novel medicines focused on disease dependency genes,” said Dr. Olson. “I am excited to lead the scientific efforts at a company conducting this type of innovative research, and look forward to working with Syros’ experienced management team and renowned scientific advisory board to develop new breakthrough therapies.”


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