Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Communities
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Double Dose of Tamiflu Offers No Added Benefit in Severe Flu

Published: Tuesday, June 04, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, June 04, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Early treatment with Tamiflu is beneficial for patients with uncomplicated flu infection.

Giving double doses of the antiviral drug Tamiflu to patients admitted to hospital with severe flu offers no clinical advantage over the standard dose, according to a randomized trial involving Oxford University researchers based in South East Asia.

This is the first study to look at the effectiveness of higher doses of Tamiflu, or oseltamivir, in cases of severe influenza infection.

The findings have implications for global guidelines on clinical management of severe flu, and also the stockpiling of drugs by national governments for pandemic preparedness, including in the current outbreak of the H7N9 bird flu virus in China.

Professor Jeremy Farrar, head of the Oxford University Clinical Research Unit in Vietnam and director of the South East Asia Infectious Disease Clinical Research Network, led the research. He said: 'The recommendation to give higher doses of oseltamivir to severe cases of flu infection has major implications for clinical management, public health, and planning for antiviral stockpiles but has not been grounded in evidence. Our findings do not support routine use of double doses to treat severe flu infections, which could help to conserve drug stocks in the event of a pandemic.'

The study is published in the medical journal BMJ and was funded by the Wellcome Trust, US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Singapore National Medical Research Council.

Most people who are infected with flu will recover in a few days or up to two weeks. But some people will develop complications, such as difficulty with breathing, that result in hospital admission and can be life-threatening.

Studies have found that early treatment with Tamiflu is beneficial for patients with uncomplicated flu infection and improves survival in hospitalized patients with severe infection. This has led some authorities to recommend double doses of the drug for treatment of patients with severe flu infections.

The new study was conducted by researchers from the South East Asia Infectious Diseases Clinical Research Network, including scientists from Oxford University clinical research units in Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam.

The trial involved 326 patients with severe flu infection at 13 hospitals in Indonesia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. Most of the patients were children under the age of 15.

Patients were given either a standard dose or double dose of Tamiflu for five days. Their virus levels were monitored for the duration of the treatment along with other outcomes, such as admission to intensive care, the need for mechanical ventilation to assist with breathing and death.

The findings reveal no difference in virus levels at day five between the different doses. There were also no clinical differences in the outcomes for patients, including need for ventilation, time in hospital, deaths, or rates of adverse events.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

The Secret Behind the Power of Bacterial Sex
Migration between different communities of bacteria is the key to the type of gene transfer that can lead to the spread of traits such as antibiotic resistance, according to researchers at Oxford University.
Tuesday, November 24, 2015
Seeking the Right Prescription in Fight Against Antibiotic Resistance
Researchers at the University of Oxford have received funding to look at ways to improve the prescribing of antibiotics.
Monday, November 23, 2015
£17M Project Launched to Develop HIV Vaccine
A new €23 million (£17 million) initiative to accelerate the search for an effective HIV vaccine has begun.
Wednesday, November 11, 2015
Blocking the Transmission Of Malaria Parasites
Vaccine candidate administered for the first time in humans in a phase I clinical trial led by Oxford University’s Jenner Institute, with partners Imaxio and GSK.
Tuesday, November 10, 2015
Mini DNA Sequencer’s Data Belies its Size
A miniature DNA sequencing device that plugs into a laptop and was developed by Oxford Nanopore has been tested by an open, international consortium, including Oxford University researchers.
Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Microbe Artwork Shows The Limits Of Antibiotics
An Oxford University research fellow has been creating art using bacteria found in the human gut and harvested from faecal samples.
Tuesday, September 29, 2015
Funding Boost for Diabetes Research
Programme of research could be a game-changer for people with Type 1 diabetes and insulin-dependent Type 2 diabetes.
Friday, July 24, 2015
Ebola Vaccine Trial Begins in Senegal
A clinical trial to evaluate an Ebola vaccine has begun in Dakar, Senegal, after initial research started at the Jenner Institute, Oxford University.
Thursday, July 16, 2015
New Insight into Recombination and Sex Chromosomes
Not only does the platypus have some odd physical features, an updated version of its genome has also underscored the unusual genetic characteristics that it harbors.
Tuesday, May 12, 2015
Protein Clue To Sudden Cardiac Death
A protein has been shown to have a surprising role in regulating the 'glue' that holds heart cells together, a finding that may explain how a gene defect could cause sudden cardiac death.
Tuesday, February 17, 2015
Oxford Vaccine Group Begins First Trial of New Ebola Vaccine
Oxford University doctors and scientists are starting the first safety trial of an experimental preventative Ebola vaccine regimen being developed by the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson (Janssen).
Wednesday, January 07, 2015
New Vaccine Generates Strong Immune Response Against Hepatitis C
A new hepatitis C vaccine has shown promising results in an early clinical trial at Oxford University, generating strong and broad immune responses against the virus causing the disease.
Friday, November 07, 2014
Investment In Cancer Research At Oxford University
Centre for Molecular Medicine to focus on cancer genomics and molecular diagnostics, through a partnership with the Chan Soon-Shiong Institute.
Friday, October 24, 2014
A-maize-ing Double Life of a Genome
Study findings could help current efforts to improve existing crop varieties.
Tuesday, July 15, 2014
Genetic Tracking Identifies Cancer Stem Cells in Patients
The gene mutations driving cancer have been tracked for the first time in patients back to a distinct set of cells at the root of cancer – cancer stem cells.
Friday, May 16, 2014
Scientific News
High Throughput Mass Spectrometry-Based Screening Assay Trends
Dr John Comley provides an insight into HT MS-based screening with a focus on future user requirements and preferences.
Promising Drug Combination for Advanced Prostate Cancer
A new drug combination may be effective in treating men with metastatic prostate cancer. Preliminary results of this new approach are encouraging and have led to an ongoing international study being conducted in 196 hospitals worldwide.
A Cellular Symphony Responsible for Autoimmune Disease
Broad Institute researchers have used a novel approach to increase our understanding of the immune system as a whole.
When it Comes to Breast Cancer, Common Pigeon is No Bird Brain
If pigeons went to medical school and specialized in pathology or radiology, they’d be pretty good at distinguishing digitized microscope slides and mammograms of normal vs. cancerous breast tissue, a new study has found.
Editing of LIMS Data Made Faster and More Efficient in Matrix Gemini
The latest version of the Matrix Gemini LIMS (Laboratory Information Management System) from Autoscribe Informatics now provides faster and more efficient editing of LIMS data by eliminating the need for a second editing screen.
University of Edinburgh, Selcia Achieve Key Milestones in Drug Development Program
Scientists from the University of Edinburgh, working with Selcia, have successfully passed the 20-month milestone targets of a 30-month Wellcome Trust SDDi £2.5 million project to design novel treatments for sleeping sickness.
Red Clover Genome to Help Restore Sustainable Farming
The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC) in collaboration with IBERS, has sequenced and assembled the DNA of red clover to help breeders improve the beneficial traits of this important forage crop.
How a Genetic Locus Protects Adult Blood-Forming Stem Cells
Mammalian imprinted Gtl2 protects adult hematopoietic stem cells by restricting metabolic activity in the cells' mitochondria.
Genetic Basis of Fatal Flu Side Effect Discovered
A group of people with fatal H1N1 flu died after their viral infections triggered a deadly hyperinflammatory disorder in susceptible individuals with gene mutations linked to the overactive immune response, according to a recent study.
New Tech Vastly Improves CRISPR/Cas9 Accuracy
A new CRISPR/Cas9 technology developed by scientists at UMass Medical School is precise enough to surgically edit DNA at nearly any genomic location, while avoiding potentially harmful off-target changes typically seen in standard CRISPR gene editing techniques.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos