Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Communities
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

NIH to Fund Clinical Research Network on Antibacterial Resistance

Published: Thursday, June 06, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, June 06, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Researchers at Duke University will lead the initiative.

Duke University, Durham, N.C., has been awarded $2 million to initiate a new clinical research network focused on antibacterial resistance.

Total funding for the leadership group cooperative agreement award could reach up to $62 million through 2019. Funding is provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.

“Antibacterial resistance is a serious and growing public health threat that is endangering the global medical community’s ability to effectively treat conditions ranging from simple skin infections to tuberculosis,” said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D.

Fauci continued, “Through this new clinical research network, we will strengthen our existing research capacity and address the most pressing scientific priorities related to antibacterial resistance.”

Infections with bacteria resistant to antibiotic drugs were first reported more than 60 years ago. Since then, infections with resistant bacteria have become more common in health care and community settings, and many bacteria have become resistant to more than one type or class of antibiotics.

As a result, medical professionals must treat infections with limited treatment options or, in some cases, when no effective antibiotics exist.

Co-led by principal investigators Vance Fowler, M.D., of Duke University, and Henry Chambers, M.D., of the University of California, San Francisco, the leadership group will design, implement and manage the network’s clinical research agenda.

In addition to the two principal investigators, the leadership group will include a consortium of more than 20 investigators nationwide with experience in diverse areas related to antibacterial resistance. The scientific efforts the leadership group is expected to undertake include:

• Conducting early-stage clinical evaluation of new antibacterial drugs
• Performing clinical trials to optimize currently licensed antibacterial drugs to reduce the risk of resistance
• Testing diagnostics
• Examining best practices in infection control programs to prevent the development and spread of resistant infections

An operations center at Duke University will anchor the network and provide administrative and technical support, a laboratory center, and a statistics and data management center.

The network will address the priority areas identified in its clinical research agenda using existing NIAID clinical trials infrastructure, including the clinical trial units that support NIAID’s HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks and Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units.

Planning for the development of the new NIAID clinical trials network on antibacterial resistance began in 2010 in connection with a larger effort to restructure NIAID’s HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks.

NIAID conducted extensive consultations with infectious disease researchers, clinicians, nurses, and patient advocates in moving forward with the concept. This award will complement NIAID’s extensive antimicrobial resistance portfolio, which includes clinical research and product development, as well as clinical trials evaluating optimal utilization strategies for currently available antibacterial drugs.

The leadership group award was made through cooperative agreement 1UM1AI104681.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,600+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

New Gene Therapy for Vision Loss From a Mitochondrial Disease
NIH-funded study shows success in targeting mitochondrial DNA in mice.
Tuesday, October 06, 2015
NIH Funding Targets Gaps in Biomedical Research
New awards support emerging issues in cutting-edge biomedical research fields.
Tuesday, October 06, 2015
Scientists Test New Gene Therapy for Vision Loss from a Mitochondrial Disease
NIH-funded study shows success in targeting mitochondrial DNA in mice.
Tuesday, October 06, 2015
Dormant Viral Genes May Awaken to Cause ALS
NIH human and mouse study may open an unexplored path for finding treatments.
Thursday, October 01, 2015
Scientists Create World’s Largest Catalog of Human Genomic Variation
An international team of scientists from the 1000 Genomes Project Consortium has created the world’s largest catalog of genomic differences among humans, providing researchers with powerful clues to help them establish why some people are susceptible to various diseases.
Thursday, October 01, 2015
Drug Used To Treat HIV Linked to Lower Bone Mass in Newborns
NIH study finds mothers’ use of tenofovir tied to lower bone mineral content in babies.
Wednesday, September 30, 2015
Repairing Nerve Pathways With 3-D Printing
A novel 3-D printing approach was used to create custom scaffolds that helped damaged rat nerves regenerate and improved the animals’ ability to walk.
Tuesday, September 29, 2015
Bone Risks Linked to Genetic Variants
A large-scale genomic study uncovered novel genetic variants and led researchers to an unexpected gene that affects bone density and fracture risk.
Tuesday, September 29, 2015
Genetic Adaptations to Diet and Climate
Researchers found genetic variations in the Inuit of Greenland that reflect adaptations to their specific diet and climate.
Tuesday, September 29, 2015
NIH Launches Landmark Study On Substance Use And Adolescent Brain Development
Thirteen grants awarded to look at cognitive and social development in approximately 10,000 children.
Monday, September 28, 2015
Grants to Help Identify Variants in the Genome’s Regulatory Regions
New computational approaches needed to wade through millions of inherited DNA differences to find which ones matter.
Thursday, September 24, 2015
Grants Awarded to Explore the Genome’s Regulatory Regions that Affect Disease Risk
New computational approaches needed to wade through millions of inherited DNA differences to find which ones matter.
Tuesday, September 22, 2015
NIH Framework Points The Way Forward For Developing The President’s Precision Medicine Initiative
The NIH Advisory Committee to the Director has presented to NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., a detailed design framework for building a national research participant group, called a cohort, of 1 million or more Americans to expand our knowledge and practice of precision medicine.
Monday, September 21, 2015
Beth Israel Cardiology Team Awarded $3 Million by NIH
Work will help predict outcomes in patients with heart disease.
Friday, September 18, 2015
Diet, Exercise, Smoking Habits and Genes Interact To Affect and Risk
NIH-funded study points to converging factors that drive disease-related inflammation.
Thursday, September 17, 2015
Scientific News
Atriva Therapeutics GmbH Develops Innovative Flu Drug
Highly effective against seasonal and pandemic influenza.
New Gene Therapy for Vision Loss From a Mitochondrial Disease
NIH-funded study shows success in targeting mitochondrial DNA in mice.
Study Removes Cancer Doubt for Multiple Sclerosis Drug
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London are calling on the medical community to reconsider developing a known drug to treat people with relapsing Multiple sclerosis after new evidence shows it does not increase the risk of cancer as previously thought.
Self-Propelled Powder to Stop Bleeding
UBC researchers have created the first self-propelled particles capable of delivering coagulants against the flow of blood to treat severe bleeding, a potentially huge advancement in trauma care.
Five New Genetic Variants Linked to Brain Cancer Identified
The biggest ever study of DNA from people with glioma – the most common form of brain cancer – has discovered five new genetic variants associated with the disease.
Antibody Treatment Efficacious in Psoriasis
An experimental, biologic treatment, brodalumab, achieved 100 percent reduction in psoriasis symptoms in twice as many patients as a second, commonly used treatment, according to the results of a multicenter clinical trial led by Mount Sinai researchers.
Predictive Model for Breast Cancer Progression
Biomedical engineers have demonstrated a proof-of-principle technique that could give women and their oncologists more personalized information to help them choose options for treating breast cancer.
Probing the Forces Involved in Creating The Mitotic Spindle
Scientists at The Rockefeller University reveal new insights into the mechanical forces that govern elements of the mitotic spindle formation.
Identifying Cancer’s Food Sensors May Help to Halt Tumour Growth
Oxford University researchers have identified a protein used by tumours to help them detect food supplies. Initial studies show that targeting the protein could restrict cancerous cells’ ability to grow.
Fatty Liver Disease and Scarring Have Strong Genetic Component
Researchers say that hepatic fibrosis, which involves scarring of the liver that can result in dysfunction and, in severe cases, cirrhosis and cancer, may be as much a consequence of genetics as environmental factors.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,600+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos