Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Fungal Findings

Published: Monday, June 10, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, June 10, 2013
Bookmark and Share
NIH team used genomic approach to gain a better understanding of the fungi in their new study.

A genomic survey of the fungi living on our skin provides a framework for understanding how these microbes contribute to skin health and disease.

Complex communities of microbes live on the surface of our bodies. These fungi, bacteria and viruses are collectively known as the skin microbiome.

A team from NIH’s National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and National Cancer Institute (NCI) previously used genomic techniques to study skin bacteria.

They found diverse bacterial communities that varied between people and by skin site. In their new study, the team used a similar genomic approach to gain a better understanding of the fungi that live on our skin.

Fungi include molds, mushrooms, and the yeast that are used to ferment bread and beer. These microbes have been associated with many skin diseases and conditions, including athlete’s foot, eczema, dandruff and toenail infections.

Fungal skin infections affect an estimated 29 million people nationwide. But fungi can be slow and difficult to grow in laboratories, making fungal infections hard to identify and treat.

As described online in Nature on May 22, 2013, the scientists collected samples at 14 body sites from 10 healthy adults. They focused on a fragment of DNA shared by all fungi-the intervening internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of ribosomal RNA-that could be used to classify fungi at the genus level with greater than 97% accuracy.

By generating more than 5 million ITS1 sequences from the samples, the team was able to identify more than 80 genus-level fungal types living on human skin. In contrast, traditional culturing methods could identify only 18 types.

Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes were found at all the skin sites. Fungi of the genus Malassezia were the predominant type on 11 of the 14 sites, including behind the ears, in nostrils, on the back, and on the arms.

The team found that heels, which don’t show extensive bacterial diversity, were the most complex site for fungi, with about 80 types represented.

Toe webs, with about 60 types, and toenails, with 40, had the next highest levels of fungal diversity. Hands and arms, which harbor a great diversity of bacteria, had relatively few types of fungi.

Fungal communities on the core body were quite stable over time, with little change when tested up to 3 months apart. In contrast, fungi on the feet altered considerably over 3 months, perhaps reflecting more environmental exposure.

“The fungal communities on the human body are complex and site-specific,” says co-senior author Dr. Heidi Kong of NCI. “By gaining a more complete awareness of the fungal and bacterial ecosystems, we can better address associated skin diseases, including fungal infections, which can be related to cancer treatments.”

“The data from our study gives us a baseline about normal individuals that we never had before,” says co-senior author Dr. Julie Segre of NHGRI. “The bottom line is your feet are teeming with fungal diversity, so wear your flip flops in locker rooms if you don’t want to mix your foot fungi with someone else’s fungi.”


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,000+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,400+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Finding Factors That Protect Against Flu
A clinical trial examining the body’s response to seasonal flu suggests new approaches for evaluating the effectiveness of seasonal flu vaccines.
Wednesday, April 27, 2016
Factors Influencing Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Uncovered
The long-held approach to predicting seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness may need to be revisited, new research suggests.
Thursday, April 21, 2016
Study Finds Factors That May Influence Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness
Researchers at NIH have suggested that the long-held approach to predicting seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness may need to be revisited.
Wednesday, April 20, 2016
Serotonin Transporter Structure Revealed
Researchers determined the 3-D structure of the serotonin transporter and visualized how two common antidepressants interact with the protein.
Wednesday, April 20, 2016
Improving Flu Vaccine Effectiveness
NIH study finds factors that may influence influenza vaccine effectiveness.
Wednesday, April 20, 2016
Submissions Open for the Cancer Moonshot Program
NCI opens online platform to submit ideas about research for Cancer Moonshot.
Tuesday, April 19, 2016
Migration Creates Cancer Cell Vulnerabilities
Scientists found that migration can damage cancer cells’ nuclei and DNA, requiring repairs for their survival. The results may open new avenues for targeting metastatic cancer.
Wednesday, April 13, 2016
NIH Sequences Genome of a Fungus
Researchers at the Institute have sequenced genome of human, mouse and rat Pneumocystis that cause life-threatening Pneumonia in immunosuppressed hosts.
Tuesday, April 12, 2016
NIH Awards Grants to Explore Vaccine Adjuvants
NIH awards six grants to explore how combination adjuvants improve vaccines.
Wednesday, April 06, 2016
Children With Cushing Syndrome May Have Higher Suicide Risk
Researchers at NIH have found that depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts increase after treatment.
Wednesday, March 30, 2016
Experimental Vaccine Protects Against Dengue Virus
An experimental dengue vaccine protected all the volunteers who received it from infection with a live dengue virus.
Wednesday, March 30, 2016
Couples’ Pre-Pregnancy Caffeine Consumption Linked to Miscarriage Risk
Researchers at NIH have found daily multivitamin before and after conception greatly reduces miscarriage risk.
Friday, March 25, 2016
Study Finds Mindfulness Meditation Offers Relief For Low-Back Pain
Researchers at NIH have found that the MBSR and CBT may prove more effective than usual treatment in alleviating chronic low-back pain.
Wednesday, March 23, 2016
3-D Technology Enriches Human Nerve Cells For Transplant to Brain
This platform is expected to make transplantation of neurons a viable treatment for a broad range of human neurodegenerative disorders.
Friday, March 18, 2016
Scientists Discover Non-Opioid Pain Pathway in the Brain
Researchers at NIH have discovered evidence for the existence of a non-opioid process in the brain to reduce pain through mindfulness meditation.
Friday, March 18, 2016
Scientific News
Releasing Cancer Cells for Better Analysis
A new device developed at the University of Michigan could provide a non-invasive way to monitor the progress of an advanced cancer treatment.
Releasing Cancer Cells for Better Analysis
A new device developed at the University of Michigan could provide a non-invasive way to monitor the progress of an advanced cancer treatment.
Apricot Kernels Pose Risk of Cyanide Poisoning
Eating more than three small raw apricot kernels, or less than half of one large kernel, in a serving can exceed safe levels. Toddlers consuming even one small apricot kernel risk being over the safe level.
Cell Transplant Treats Parkinson’s in Mice
A University of Wisconsin—Madison neuroscientist has inserted a genetic switch into nerve cells so a patient can alter their activity by taking designer drugs that would not affect any other cell.
Understanding Female HIV Transmission
Glowing virus maps points of entry through entire female reproductive tract for first time.
Genetic Markers Influence Addiction
Differences in vulnerability to cocaine addiction and relapse linked to both inherited traits and epigenetics, U-M researchers find.
Lab-on-a-Chip for Detecting Glucose
By integrating microfluidic chips with fiber optic biosensors, researchers in China are creating ultrasensitive lab-on-a-chip devices to detect glucose levels.
A lncRNA Regulates Repair of DNA Breaks in Breast Cancer Cells
Findings give "new insight" into biology of tough-to-treat breast cancer.
COPD Linked to Increased Bacterial Invasion
Persistent inflammation in COPD may result from a defect in the immune system that allows airway bacteria to invade deeper into the lung.
Detection of HPV in First-Void Urine
Similar sensitivity of HPV test on first void urine sample compared to cervical smear.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,400+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!