Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Communities
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Yale Researchers Unravel Genetics of Dyslexia and Language Impairment

Published: Tuesday, June 18, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, June 18, 2013
Bookmark and Share
A new study of the genetic origins of dyslexia and other learning disabilities could allow for earlier diagnoses and more successful interventions.

Many students now are not diagnosed until high school, at which point treatments are less effective.

The study is published online and in the July print issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics. Senior author Dr. Jeffrey R. Gruen, professor of pediatrics, genetics, and investigative medicine at Yale, and colleagues analyzed data from more than 10,000 children born in 1991-1992 who were part of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) conducted by investigators at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom.

Gruen and his team used the ALSPAC data to unravel the genetic components of reading and verbal language. In the process, they identified genetic variants that can predispose children to dyslexia and language impairment, increasing the likelihood of earlier diagnosis and more effective interventions.

Dyslexia and language impairment are common learning disabilities that make reading and verbal language skills difficult. Both disorders have a substantial genetic component, but despite years of study, determining the root cause had been difficult.

In previous studies, Gruen and his team found that dopamine-related genes ANKK1 and DRD2 are involved in language processing. In further non-genetic studies, they found that prenatal exposure to nicotine has a strong negative affect on both reading and language processing. They had also previously found that a gene called DCDC2 was linked to dyslexia.

In this new study, Gruen and colleagues looked deeper within the DCDC2 gene to pinpoint the specific parts of the gene that are responsible for dyslexia and language impairment. They found that some variants of a gene regulator called READ1 (regulatory element associated with dyslexia1) within the DCDC2 gene are associated with problems in reading performance while other variants are strongly associated with problems in verbal language performance.

Gruen said these variants interact with a second dyslexia risk gene called KIAA0319. “When you have risk variants in both READ1 and KIAA0319, it can have a multiplier effect on measures of reading, language, and IQ,” he said. “People who have these variants have a substantially increased likelihood of developing dyslexia or language impairment.”

“These findings are helping us to identify the pathways for fluent reading, the components of those pathways; and how they interact,” said Gruen. “We now hope to be able to offer a pre-symptomatic diagnostic panel, so we can identify children at risk before they get into trouble at school. Almost three-quarters of these children will be reading at grade level if they get early intervention, and we know that intervention can have a positive lasting effect.”

Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 5,200+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Editing Gene Mutations in Anemia
Researchers successfully use a new gene editing strategy to correct mutations that cause a form of anemia.
Wednesday, October 26, 2016
Genes Help Track Odd Migrations of Zika Mosquitoes
Study shows that mosquitoes carrying Zika virus or Dengue fever a genetically distinct around the world.
Wednesday, October 26, 2016
Study Finds Key Regulator in Pulmonary Fibrosis
Researchers identify an enzyme that could open the way to therpies for chronic fatal lung disease.
Thursday, October 20, 2016
Alzheimer’s-Linked Protein May Play Role in Schizophrenia
Researchers suggests a protein linked to cognitive decline in Alzheimer's also plays a role in genetic predisposition to schizophrenia.
Wednesday, October 19, 2016
Ovarian Cancer Insight
Study showed tumours release cytokines to attract macrophages, which secrete growth factors that in turn promote tumour growth.
Wednesday, October 19, 2016
Fatty Liver Disease Linked to Type 2 Diabetes
Recent study identifies factors causing insulin to misbehave in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
Tuesday, October 18, 2016
New Model for Understanding Human Myeloma
Researchers develop mouse model where mice carry six human genes involved in human tumour growth.
Monday, October 17, 2016
Less is More in Ribosome Assembly
Research uncovers genetic "program" that allows for ribosome formation with a limited supply of magnesium.
Monday, October 17, 2016
Genes Behind Certain Aggressive Cancers Identified
Researchers have found the genes behind aggressive ovarian and endometrial cancers.
Tuesday, October 11, 2016
Cancer Drug Resistance Runs Deeper Than Single Gene
Study suggests abnormalities in gene networks offer better therapy response prediction than individual genes.
Monday, October 10, 2016
New Way to Suppress Lung Tumours
Researchers uncover new blocking mechanism that inhibits cancer growth without blockading critical process.
Wednesday, October 05, 2016
Insight into Eye Diseases
Scientists recreate zebrafish cell regeneration from retinal stem cells in mice.
Wednesday, September 28, 2016
Studies Explore the Science of Cardiovascular Diseases
Two studies highlight how basic science research insights are key to future treatment breakthroughs.
Monday, September 26, 2016
Fighting Cancer with Sticky Nanoparticles
Treatment that uses bioadhesive nanoparticles drug carriers proved more effective than conventional treatments for certain cancers.
Thursday, September 22, 2016
Small Molecules Lead to a Big Change in Reaction Outcomes
Scientists have changed the behaviour of a group of molecules involved in carbon-oxygen bond synthesis.
Wednesday, September 21, 2016
Scientific News
How it Works: Advanced Data Analysis Using Visualization
Visualisation of data can be used to help molecular biologists tackle the vast datasets their experiments create.
Unravelling the Role of Key Genes and DNA Methylation in Blood Cell Malignancies
Researchers from the University of Nebraska Medical Center have demonstrated the role of Dnmt3a in safeguarding normal haematopoiesis.
Salford Lung Study - The First Real World Clinical Trial
In this podcast, we learn about the Salford Lung Study and its potential to revolutionize the way we assess new drugs and treatments around the world.
A Simple Tool for Clinical and Postmortem Toxicological Analysis
In this study, GC-MS is used for the determination of clozapine, and five antidepressants in human plasma, serum and whole blood.
Identification of Individual Red Blood Cells by Raman Microspectroscopy
In this study, Raman Microspectroscopy was used to identify individual red blood cells.
Fighting Cancer with the Power of Immunity
Researchers at MIT have used a combination of four different therapies to activate both of the immune system’s two branches, producing a coordinated attack that led to the complete disappearance of large, aggressive tumors in mice.
NIH Researchers Unveil New Wound-Healing Role for Protein-Folding Gene in Mice
The study found that topical treatment of an Hsp60-containing gel dramatically accelerates wound closure in a diabetic mouse model.
50-Year-Old Bacteria Could Be Alternative Treatment Option for Cancer
Researchers have developed a non-toxic strain of Salmonella to penetrate and target cancer cells.
Promising Blood Test Fails to Yield Clues About Best Strategies for Bladder Cancer Treatment
Penn Medicine research challenges previous findings on utility of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio as a biomarker.
Robotic Cleaning Technique Could Automate Neuroscience Research
New robotic cleaning technique allows pipettes used in patch-clamping to be re-used up to 11 or more times.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,200+ scientific videos