Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Sixteen New Genetic Regions for Allergies Discovered

Published: Monday, July 01, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, July 01, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Regions discovered during two of the largest genetic studies ever conducted on common allergies, including pollen, dust-mite and cat allergies.

Together they are responsible for at least 25 per cent of allergy in the population. Eight of the genetic variations have previously been associated with asthma. The discoveries, published today in Nature Genetics, are a major step towards understanding the biological basis of common allergies.

Allergies are very common. According to Allergy UK, around 21 million adults in the UK suffer from at least one allergy. The numbers are increasing every year and, in the UK, it is estimated that 50 per cent of all children are diagnosed with an allergic condition.

The first study, undertaken by the Early Genetics and Lifecourse Epidemiology research cohort (EAGLE), which includes Children of the 90s (ALSPAC) at the University of Bristol, involved almost 32,000 individuals from 16 studies worldwide.

The EAGLE study was conducted in two stages. The first compared 5,809 allergy sufferers with 9,875 non-allergy sufferers (controls). Allergy was assessed objectively by measuring allergen levels in blood or by a skin-prick test. The second phase replicated the study in 6,145 independent allergy sufferers and 10,137 controls.

Ten of the genetic locations were associated with self-reported allergy symptoms in an independent companion study of 53,000 individuals conducted by 23andMe, the American personal genetics company, and Children of the 90s.

Professor John Henderson from Children of the 90s, who was involved in the EAGLE study, said: "Allergy is an important component of many diseases, including asthma, eczema and hay fever, which together account for a huge burden on patients and the health services. This is a very exciting time for allergy research. Genetic discoveries have identified specific pathways of allergy development that are not shared with allergic diseases like asthma. Understanding these pathways could lead to eventual development of drugs that cure or prevent allergy rather than just suppressing its symptoms."

Dr David Hinds, 23andMe principal scientist who was involved in the 23andMe study said: "We’ve seen some substantial increases in prevalence of allergies and asthma. Although environmental factors certainly play a role, our study reinforces the genetic link between common allergens and a person’s susceptibility to experiencing an allergic reaction.

"Additionally, current estimates of the heritability of allergies are high, which suggests that understanding the genetic factors underlying allergic conditions may be key to understanding who might be most likely to suffer from allergies and how the condition might best be treated."

Dr Nic Timpson from Children of the 90s, who was involved in both studies, added: "One of the key features of this work is the demonstration that with a suitably sized study, the analysis of medically relevant questionnaire data alongside genetic variation has the potential to yield important information concerning the underlying biology of a complex outcome.

"Indeed, through a collaborative interaction with colleagues from EAGLE where specific tests of allergic sensitization were available, we were able to independently replicate many of the findings made here."


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 3,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Human Trials of Manufactured Blood Within Two Years
The first human trials of lab-produced blood to help create better-matched blood for patients with complex blood conditions has been announced by NHS Blood and Transplant.
Monday, June 29, 2015
Researchers to Use Algae to Clean up Mine Water
Algae will harvest the precious heavy metals and produce biofuel at the same time.
Friday, December 05, 2014
‘Switching off’ Autoimmune Diseases
Scientists have made an important breakthrough in the fight against debilitating autoimmune diseases by revealing how to stop cells attacking healthy body tissue.
Thursday, September 04, 2014
Protein Responsible for Controlling Communication Between Brain Cells Identified
Scientists are a step closer to understanding how some of the brain’s 100 billion nerve cells co-ordinate their communication.
Thursday, November 28, 2013
Manipulation of Protein Could Help Stop Spread of Cancer Cells
New findings, published in the Nature journal Oncogene, reveal how a protein, PRH, is normally able to prevent cells from unnecessary migration.
Monday, November 18, 2013
Dogs Could Act as Effective Early-Warning System for Patients with Diabetes
Dogs that are trained to respond to their owners’ hypoglycaemia could offer a very effective way to alert diabetic patients of impending lowered blood sugars.
Wednesday, August 21, 2013
Researchers Find Key to Blood-Clotting Process
Researchers have uncovered a key process in understanding how blood clots form that could help pave the way for new therapies to reduce the risk of heart attacks.
Wednesday, June 26, 2013
Molecular Modelling to Help Create Better, Safer Drugs
How our bodies break down the common drugs ibuprofen, diclofenac and warfarin is the subject of a new study from the University of Bristol.
Friday, May 24, 2013
Random Walks on DNA
Scientists have revealed how a bacterial enzyme has evolved an energy-efficient method to move long distances along DNA.
Monday, April 22, 2013
Major Breakthrough in Deciphering Bread Wheat's Genetic Code
UK, German and US scientists decipher complex genetic code to create new tools for breeders and researchers across the world.
Thursday, November 29, 2012
Debating the Science and Ethics of Synthetic Biology
The science and ethics of synthetic biology and what it means for the UK will be the subject of a Royal Society of Chemistry debate to be streamed live on Wednesday 14 November.
Tuesday, November 06, 2012
Scientific News
NIH Study Finds Calorie Restriction Lowers Some Risk Factors for Age-Related Diseases
Two-year trial did not produce expected metabolic changes, but influenced other life span markers.
Immunotherapy Agent Benefits Patients with Drug-Resistant Multiple Myeloma in First Human Trial
Daratumumab proved generally safe in patients, even at the highest doses.
Low-level Arsenic Exposure Before Birth Associated with Early Puberty in Female Mice
Study examine whether low-dose arsenic exposure could have similar health outcomes in humans.
Inciting an Immune Attack On Cancer Cells
A new minimally invasive vaccine that combines cancer cells and immune-enhancing factors could be used clinically to launch a destructive attack on tumors.
‘Mutation-Tracking’ Blood Test for Breast Cancer
Scientists have developed a blood test for breast cancer able to identify which patients will suffer a relapse after treatment, months before tumours are visible on hospital scans.
Cellular Contamination Pathway for Heavy Elements Identified
Berkeley Lab scientists find that an iron-binding protein can transport actinides into cells.
Intensity of Desert Storms May Affect Ocean Phytoplankton
MIT study finds phytoplankton are extremely sensitive to changing levels of desert dust.
Common ‘Heart Attack’ Blood Test May Predict Future Hypertension
Small rises in troponin levels may have value as markers for subclinical heart damage and high blood pressure.
LaVision BioTec Reports on the Neuro Research on the Human Brain After Trauma
Company reports on the work of Dr Ali Ertürk from the Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research at LMU Munich.
NIH Study Shows No Benefit of Omega-3 Supplements for Cognitive Decline
Research was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!