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ZEISS Acquires Xradia

Published: Friday, July 19, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, July 19, 2013
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X-ray microscopy solutions close the gap between light and electron microscopy.

The closing took place on July 12, 2013 after all formal conditions, as set in the Acquisition Agreement, were fulfilled. Xradia, Inc. is now operating under the new name of Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, Inc. This acquisition further strengthens the position of the ZEISS Microscopy business group, the only manufacturer of light, electron and X-ray microscopes, with unique solutions for research and routine inspection in materials and life sciences application fields.

X-ray microscopes show unique capabilities in materials research, allowing for 3D imaging of the internal structure of materials. Spatial resolution down to 50 nanometers can be achieved on a laboratory-based system. The non-destructive nature of X-ray imaging enables the observation and quantification of microstructural evolution in the same region of a single sample over time, or under changing environmental conditions. Several examples of in situ and 4D (three-dimensional imaging over time) experiments are proving beneficial for research and industry, including crack propagation in ceramics and metals, porosity and permeability characterization of geological and functional materials, failure analysis of structural materials, biomechanical systems under load, and the evolution of defects in operating lithium ion batteries and fuel cells.

X-ray microscopes close the resolution gap between light and electron microscopy and offer scientists multiple new imaging modalities to complement their research. The unique optical design allows the ZEISS Xradia Ultra and Versa series to cover a large resolution range, enabling the user to easily find the region of interest by zooming into larger samples (Scout-and-Zoom). ZEISS is working towards integrated workflow solutions for life sciences and materials research. In materials science, this is typically achieved by using X-ray microscopes to perform non-destructive 4D microstructural evolution experiments prior to destructive sectioning and then using electron microscope techniques for additional resolution and contrast. In life sciences, X-ray microscopes are being used to provide a navigational map of the subsurface after tissue samples have been stained for electron microscope investigation. By incorporating 3D X-ray microscopes into this workflow, the emerging 3D electron microscope techniques will gain a significant boost in efficiency.

While maintaining close customer relationships and continuing with current projects, ZEISS is leveraging its vast sales force to make the X-ray technology more accessible in a broader range of applications and workflows. Customers will also benefit from direct service capabilities at multiple locations globally.

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