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Measure Molecular Size of Proteins & Polymers

Published: Tuesday, July 23, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, July 23, 2013
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Easy and fast measurement of intrinsic viscosity with m-VROC.

RheoSense, Inc. has announced another measurement capability to its unrivalled flagship viscometer, m-VROC.

The m-VROC is now equipped with the highest resolution to detect and measure Intrinsic Viscosity, a capability indispensable for all bio/pharma and polymer applications.

Intrinsic Viscosity is a parameter used to determine the molecular size, weight, structure, and interactions among proteins, polymers, or macromolecules.

Applications related to polymerization, degradation, interaction, and the stability of molecules all benefit by utilizing Intrinsic Viscosity.

Measuring intrinsic viscosity is considered to be a more reliable method than light scattering to study and understand these phenomena.

RheoSense m-VROC, the high-precision, industry-leading viscometer, excels at measuring intrinsic viscosity.

RheoSense has been at the forefront of viscometry for smallest sample volume and measured in the shortest amount of time.

Until now, Ubbelohde or Cannon-Fenske glass capillary viscometer is one of the few viscometers that can measure intrinsic viscosity, with high repeatability.

However, this method requires large amount of sample volume, usually more than 20 ml, and requires a long time for thermal equilibrium. All these issues are now eliminated with m-VROC.

With RheoSense m-VROC, intrinsic viscosity measurement is easy and fast, requiring just 20 microliters and takes only a few minutes.


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