Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

£4.8m Funding Awarded for Smart Approaches to Reduce Animal use in Science

Published: Wednesday, July 31, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, July 31, 2013
Bookmark and Share
NC3Rs grants will develop new testing methods, infrastructure and technologies.

Work to replace and reduce animal use in science and improve animal welfare has today received a £4.8m funding boost with the award of 20 research and technology development grants to universities, specialist institutes and small-to-medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Novel methods being funded by the UK’s National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) will reduce reliance on a range of animal species and accelerate the discovery of treatments across several therapeutic areas. These include an alternative method for anti-cancer drug development to replace the use of millions of mice globally, the development of an entirely new way of studying tuberculosis infection by using human cells, and a 3D cell model of the bovine airway which uses abattoir material to study bovine respiratory diseases, the cause of around 30% of cattle deaths worldwide.

As part of the allocation, £1.3m of strategic funding goes towards improving the infrastructure for UK bioscience whilst reducing animal use in areas such as breast cancer and trauma research. This includes the setting-up of collaborative networks to share and analyse data, and a multi-user, multi-centre magnetic resonance imaging initiative. Infrastructure funding is also provided for an e-learning tool to improve training in laboratory animal anaesthesia and perioperative care.

£1.25m is awarded through the NC3Rs CRACK IT Challenges programme, which funds commercial technology development in response to major animal research challenges faced by industry and academia.

Through this programme, a novel project with Edinburgh-based SME Actual Analytics Ltd has received funding to develop a mouse cage with an integrated ‘big brother’-style video monitoring system, which will record specific types of behaviour and allow for social   interaction in mice being studied for nervous system disorders. The automated, non-surgical system will improve animal welfare for this type of research since animal handling and other interventions would be greatly reduced. It will also allow for monitoring of individual mice when housed together in their natural grouping, rather than individually, producing more reliable results compared with current observational methods.

Today’s funding announcement coincides with the appointment of the new NC3Rs Board Chairman, asthma expert Professor Stephen Holgate CBE, University of Southampton.

Commenting on this year’s grant awards and his appointment, Professor Holgate said:

“These awards demonstrate the ingenuity of the UK’s scientific sector to develop smart approaches which reduce the reliance on animal use and further improve welfare practices across many different research areas. I am greatly looking forward to continuing my work with the NC3Rs over the next five years in this new capacity and driving forward the vital work to replace, reduce and refine animal use in science.”

Minister for Universities and Science, David Willetts, said:

“This funding from the NC3Rs to support research, infrastructure and technology development is vital to ensure the UK remains at the forefront of international efforts to reduce animal use in science while seeking breakthroughs in treating serious disease.”

The Medical Research Council (MRC) is the major core funder of the NC3Rs, Professor Sir John Savill, Chief Executive, MRC, said:

“The use of animals in research is still vitally important and the MRC only funds research where proper consideration has been given to the replacement, refinement or reduction of animal use in a study’s design. The work of the NC3Rs provides the highest quality research into how to achieve these criteria and we have been and will continue to be a major funder of their work.

“The appointment of Professor Stephen Holgate is great news. Stephen’s commitment and drive is well known to the MRC, not least for the way in which he expertly chaired our Population and Systems Medicine Board.”


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,000+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,400+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

£1.5M Invested to Improve Animal Research
The funding has been awarded to develop advanced imaging technologies, to maximise their potential to reduce animal use in a diverse range of preclinical research applications.
Tuesday, April 29, 2014
Rising to the Latest Technology Challenges in Animal Research
£1.56 million for proof-of-concepts awarded through the NC3Rs’ CRACK IT Challenges competition.
Thursday, January 30, 2014
£993,000 Challenge Funding Awarded to Develop Animal Research Alternatives and Refinements
CRACK IT seeks proof-of-concepts to replace, reduce and refine animal use across efficacy and safety testing.
Wednesday, February 13, 2013
Scientific News
Releasing Cancer Cells for Better Analysis
A new device developed at the University of Michigan could provide a non-invasive way to monitor the progress of an advanced cancer treatment.
Releasing Cancer Cells for Better Analysis
A new device developed at the University of Michigan could provide a non-invasive way to monitor the progress of an advanced cancer treatment.
Apricot Kernels Pose Risk of Cyanide Poisoning
Eating more than three small raw apricot kernels, or less than half of one large kernel, in a serving can exceed safe levels. Toddlers consuming even one small apricot kernel risk being over the safe level.
Cell Transplant Treats Parkinson’s in Mice
A University of Wisconsin—Madison neuroscientist has inserted a genetic switch into nerve cells so a patient can alter their activity by taking designer drugs that would not affect any other cell.
Understanding Female HIV Transmission
Glowing virus maps points of entry through entire female reproductive tract for first time.
Genetic Markers Influence Addiction
Differences in vulnerability to cocaine addiction and relapse linked to both inherited traits and epigenetics, U-M researchers find.
Lab-on-a-Chip for Detecting Glucose
By integrating microfluidic chips with fiber optic biosensors, researchers in China are creating ultrasensitive lab-on-a-chip devices to detect glucose levels.
A lncRNA Regulates Repair of DNA Breaks in Breast Cancer Cells
Findings give "new insight" into biology of tough-to-treat breast cancer.
COPD Linked to Increased Bacterial Invasion
Persistent inflammation in COPD may result from a defect in the immune system that allows airway bacteria to invade deeper into the lung.
Detection of HPV in First-Void Urine
Similar sensitivity of HPV test on first void urine sample compared to cervical smear.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,400+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!