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Best Performing Accelerating Rate Calorimeter

Published: Monday, August 12, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, August 12, 2013
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The new NETZSCH ARC® 254 from NETZSCH.

NETZSCH Instrument North America, LLC (NETZSCH) has announced the new Accelerating Rate Calorimeter (model ARC® 254).

It is a specialized instrument to help chemical, pharmaceutical and battery industries operate safely and profitably.

The ARC 254 is the best performing system in its class; highly versatile, miniature chemical reactor. This instrument measures the thermal and pressure properties of exothermic chemical reactions.

The resulting information helps engineers and scientists identify potential hazards and tackle key elements of process optimization and thermal stability.

“Although originally developed for the chemical industry, the ARCs are widely used now to look at the thermal stability of batteries in order to avoid accidents such as the recent Boeing 787 lithium ion battery incident.“ commented Peter Ralbovsky, calorimetry expert.

Its fastest tracking rate up to 200 K/min ensures more reliable data and a wider range of applications. The ARC 254 can be coupled with the patented VariPhi™ technology to increase instrument productivity and to provide more methods of operation unavailable on other systems.

Effective detection of both exothermic and endothermic transitions and sample Cp can be achieved by the versatile operating modes on ARC 254.

“The new ARC254 uses the-state-of-the-art electronics and firmware which provide superior data collection, operational control, and safety, which is important when testing highly energetic material.”

Noted Jean-Francois Mauger, R&D director. “The ARC 254 is controlled by the same powerful Proteus® software which user can use to operate all other NETZSCH thermal analysis instruments in the lab.”


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