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New Development: Bosch Presents Elematic 3001 Case Packer

Published: Monday, August 19, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, August 19, 2013
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Enhances user friendliness and hygiene.

At FachPack 2013 in Nuremberg, Germany, September 24 to 26 2013, Bosch Packaging Technology debuts its new Elematic 3001 case packer.

During the development and conceptual phase of the Elematic 3000’s successor, Bosch especially focused on enhanced ease of use and safety at the working place as well as increased production hygiene.

New design for increased safety and efficiency
Thanks to the new ergonomic design with a lowered carton magazine, manufacturers benefit from an easier and safer operation of the machine. In addition, the process of refilling the glue was optimized with an external hot glue tube which protects operators from burns.

Both features contribute to increased workplace safety and fulfill increasingly stringent regulations worldwide. Bernhard Vaihinger, head of product management, innovation and technology at Bosch Packaging Systems GmbH, a Bosch Packaging Technology company, highlights, “Manufacturers have to consider increasingly stringent legal requirements that are affecting packaging machinery design in terms of ergonomics and hygiene. At the same time, they cannot sacrifice productivity. Our new development enables manufacturers to achieve both.”

Format changeover with feedback
Similar to the Elematic series of secondary packaging machines from Bosch, the new Elematic 3001 can handle many different pack styles, including tray, classic full wrap-around and two-part, shelf-ready packaging. This is especially important for manufacturers supporting different brands and products with a variety of pack styles.

With the new Elematic 3001, easy and tool-less packaging format changeovers are realized thanks to a so-called “click-system”. When parts lock into place a sound indicates the successful format changeover. Manufacturers benefit from higher efficiency as time-consuming corrections are eliminated and errors while using scales are avoided.

Hygienic design enhances cleanability
Compared to previous models, Bosch further enhanced the machine’s hygienic design. With fewer components, the frame has an open design and is easily accessible. Horizontal surfaces and corners have been eliminated and corrosion-resistant materials, such as stainless steel, anodized aluminum or brass, are used.

In addition, all wiring and cables are hidden due to design-integrated conduits to protect them from dirt and damage. All features contribute to enhanced cleanability of the machine, which increases production hygiene.

Minimized maintenance reduces TCO
The minimized number of components and added new technologies, including servo drives, decrease maintenance work and reduce the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) of the new Elematic 3001.

The incorporation of the total productive maintenance (TPM) concept indicates when maintenance is due, helping eliminate unplanned downtime, and increasing productivity.

To further reduce the footprint of the machine, the company integrated the control cabinet on board, which speeds up installation time at the customer’s plant.

In addition, thanks to the compact design of the machine, it meets the sea and air freight standards, decreasing overseas transportation costs.

The Elematic 3001 will be on display at Bosch’s Stand 305, Hall 4A of the Exhibition Centre, Nuremberg, September 24 to 26, 2013.


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