Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

ZEISS Crossbeam Sets New Standards in 3D Nanotomography and Nanofabrication

Published: Tuesday, August 27, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, August 27, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Fast materials processing and high resolution imaging.

ZEISS will be presenting the first system of the new Crossbeam series at the MC 2013 in Regensburg, Germany.

Its outstanding features include high speed in materials analysis and processing and its wide diversity of applications.

Time intensive 3D experiments that used to run for several days can now be completed overnight.

The newly developed focused ion beam (FIB) column enables fast and precise materials processing that can be observed with the field emission scanning electron microscope in real-time.

High resolution over the entire voltage and current range allows users to work quickly and precisely. Designed for stability, the system ensures reproducible results even in long-term experiments.

The field of application is expanded by the optionally available Massive Ablation Laser that rapidly prepares samples to access deeply buried regions of interest. Crossbeam is suitable for use in both materials and life sciences.

Materials scientists benefit from the excellent 3D analytics, the ability to image magnetic and non-conductive specimens with maximum resolution, and from the unique material contrasts.

Bioscientists can use Crossbeam, above all, for fast tomography series with high Z resolution in cell and tissue biology. The STEM detection module delivers additional structural information.

The system offers automated workflows, e.g. for TEM lamella preparation. At the same time, the open software offers users the possibility of integrating and automating their own applications.

The modular design of Crossbeam makes it an open 3D nano workstation that can be configured and field-upgraded for a broad spectrum of today’s and future applications, therefore offering the user maximum flexibility.

The microscope system is available in two versions. The GEMINI I VP (variable pressure) column of Crossbeam 340 offers optimal analysis conditions for in situ experiments with outgassing and charging specimens.

Thanks to the GEMINI II column with double condenser system, Crossbeam 540 users benefit from more information in a shorter time.

The system delivers high resolution, even with low voltage and high beam current, enabling fast analytics and ease of use.

In combination with a ZEISS Xradia X-ray microscope (XRM), Crossbeam offers the possibility of complete specimen analysis across several orders of magnitude.

The X-ray microscope first provides a 3D image of the specimen without destroying it before the identified areas of interest are processed with the focused ion beam and analyzed with the electron beam.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 5,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Collaboration Between Carl Zeiss Microscopy and Gatan Announced
In situ ultramicrotome turns ZEISS FE-SEM into high speed 3D cell and tissue imaging system.
Monday, November 26, 2012
Carl Zeiss Nano Image Contest Off to a Successful Start
More than 70 users of ZEISS electron and ion microscopes have already submitted their nano masterpieces to the first ever Carl Zeiss Nano Image Contest.
Thursday, July 22, 2010
Carl Zeiss Still Committed to the Fight against Tuberculosis
Company announces special price for diagnostic microscope in 74 countries.
Tuesday, March 23, 2010
Carl Zeiss Microscopy Receives Fifth Consecutive R&D 100 Award
LSM 5 DUO – the Laser Scanning Microscope Awarded the "Oscar of Inventions".
Monday, July 24, 2006
PALM MicroBeam Laser Technology from Carl Zeiss Receives the Berthold Leibinger Innovation Prize
The Berthold Leibinger Innovation Prize is the international award for applied laser technology with the highest prize money.
Friday, July 14, 2006
Zeiss Optimises Axio Imager.A1
The Axio Imager.A1 incorporates an LED illumination system to boost the price/performance ratio.
Friday, February 10, 2006
Scientific News
Point of Care Diagnostics - A Cautious Revolution
Advances in molecular biology, coupled with the miniaturization and improved sensitivity of assays and devices in general, have enabled a new wave of point-of-care (POC) or “bedside” diagnostics.
Mass Spec Technology Drives Innovation Across the Biopharma Workflow
With greater resolving power, analytical speed, and accuracy, new mass spectrometry technology and techniques are infiltrating the biopharmaceuticals workflow.
One Step Closer to Precision Medicine for Chronic Lung Disease Sufferers
A study led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and National Jewish Health, has provided evidence of links between SNPs and known COPD blood protein biomarkers.
Blood Pressure Drug May Boost Effectiveness of Lung Cancer Treatment
Researchers at Imperial College London have suggested that the blood pressure drug may make a type of lung cancer treatment more effective.
Insight into Eye Diseases
Scientists recreate zebrafish cell regeneration from retinal stem cells in mice.
New Discovery May Benefit Farmers Worldwide
Scientists have shown how a crop-microbe 'team' protect against fungal infection.
Antibodies Paving the Way to HIV Vaccine
Researchers uncover factors responsible for the formation of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies in humans.
Designing Drugs with a Whole New Toolbox
Researchers develop methods to design small, targeted proteins with shapes not found in nature.
Protein Studies Discover Molecular Secrets
Two protein studies have mapped proteins that reveal the secrets to recycling carbon and healing cells.
Tapping Evolution to Improve Biotech Products
Researchers show how 'ancestral sequence reconstruction' can be used to guide engineering of a blood clotting protein.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,000+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!