Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Lung Disease and Melanoma: a Common Molecular Mechanism?

Published: Monday, September 02, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, September 02, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Researchers have solved a biological mystery about the common genesis of many serious diseases such as asthma and metastatic melanoma.

Scientists have identified the first known pathway by which their cellular functions turn abnormal, and a healthy process goes haywire. The study is published in Cell Reports.

The team focused on an ancient gene family known as “18 glycosyl hydrolase (GH 18),” and in particular, one protein known as chitinase 3-like-1 (Chi3l1). This protein plays a critical role in the body’s response to foreign pathogens, augmenting the killing of bacteria while controlling inflammation and cell death to keep the immune response from harming normal tissue.

Although previous studies from this Yale team and colleagues have helped define the roles of Chi3l1 in biology, the mechanism by which it works — and triggers disease when overexpressed — was not known. The Yale team knew that Chi3l1 was not functioning as an enzyme would. They theorized that it acted, instead, by binding to a cellular receptor. Their studies led them to focus on a receptor known as IL-13Rα2, which was thought to be a so-called “decoy receptor” that binds molecules but does not induce cellular signaling or activate a biologic response.

Their experiments in mice proved that IL-13Rα2 was no decoy at all, but an active participant in the signaling pathway. The binding of overexpressed Chi3l1 and the receptor IL-13Rα2 began a cascade of subsequent reactions in the mice that resulted in lung disease, lung melanoma metastasis, and a host of other diseases.

“What we discovered was that when Chi3l1 is produced, IL-13Rα2 binds it and acts as a catalyst, triggering important biologic responses such as the control of cell death and production of inflammatory mediators,” said senior author Dr. Jack A. Elias, chair of internal medicine at Yale School of Medicine and a member of Yale Cancer Center.

Elias hopes that further research will identify more receptors in this family, and he sees a potential for developing therapies based on his team’s findings. “These molecules are expressed abnormally in a number of diseases, so the idea that you can control them is exciting. Perhaps we can develop an antibody or a small molecule that blocks their action and changes cellular function.”


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,400+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 3,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Gene Testing Now Allows Precision Medicine for Thoracic Aneurysms
Researchers at the Aortic Institute at Yale have tested the genomes of more than 100 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms, a potentially lethal condition, and provided genetically personalized care.
Monday, July 20, 2015
Creating More Potent Vaccines
Yale researchers uncovered a new role for a type of immune cell, known as regulatory T cells, in promoting long-term immunity.
Wednesday, July 08, 2015
Yale Team finds why BRCA Gene Resists Cancer Treatment
The University researchers have discovered why a key molecular assistant is crucial to the function of the BRCA2 gene.
Tuesday, July 07, 2015
New Type of Drug Can Target All Disease-causing Proteins
Current drugs block the actions of only about a quarter of known disease-causing proteins, but Yale University researchers have developed a technology capable of not just inhibiting, but destroying every protein it targets.
Monday, June 15, 2015
After a Sip of Milkshake, Genes and Brain Activity Predict Weight Gain
The new study published in The Journal Neuroscience.
Thursday, May 21, 2015
Researchers Solve Multiple Sclerosis Puzzle
Yale study shows the role that T cells play in MS.
Monday, May 18, 2015
Gene Editing Corrects Mutation In Cystic Fibrosis
Yale researchers successfully corrected the most common mutation in the gene that causes cystic fibrosis, a lethal genetic disorder.
Monday, April 27, 2015
New Tool To Explore Mysteries Of The Immune System
Yale scientists use CyTOF to study a range of conditions.
Monday, April 20, 2015
A Faster, Less Expensive Way To Analyze Gene Activity
Yale researchers have devised a method that could reduce the time and cost of analyzing gene activity.
Tuesday, March 03, 2015
Li Ka Shing Foundation Renews Support for Yale Stem Cell Center
New generous grant of $1.86 million from LKSF to support education and healthcare initiatives.
Saturday, February 28, 2015
Single-Cell, 42-plexed Protein Analysis Achieved with a New Microchip Technology
A novel microdevice capable of detecting 42 unique immune effector proteins has been developed.
Tuesday, February 17, 2015
Yale Team Identifies Key Process In Brain Development
miR-107 shown to play essential role in regulating normal brain development.
Friday, February 06, 2015
Cold Virus Replicates Better At Cooler Temperatures
Study shows that the immune response to rhinovirus is influenced by temperature.
Tuesday, January 06, 2015
Healthy Brain Development Balanced on Edge of a Cellular ‘Sword’
The study helps explain the molecular basis of complex brain abnormalities.
Wednesday, December 24, 2014
New Class of Synthetic Molecules Mimics Antibodies
A Yale University lab has crafted the first synthetic molecules that have both the targeting and response functions of antibodies.
Wednesday, December 24, 2014
Scientific News
Study Finds Brain Chemicals that Keep Wakefulness in Check
Researchers to develop new drugs that promote better sleep, or control hyperactivity in people with mania.
Sorting Through Cellular Statistics
Aaron Dinner, professor in chemistry, and his graduate student Herman Gudjonson are trying to read the manual of life, DNA, as part of the Dinner group’s research into bioinformatics—the application of statistics to biological research.
Playing 'Tag' with Pollution lets Scientists See Who's It
Using a climate model that can tag sources of soot from different global regions and can track where it lands on the Tibetan Plateau, researchers have determined which areas around the plateau contribute the most soot — and where.
Women’s Immune System Genes Operate Differently from Men’s
A new technology reveals that immune system genes switch on and off differently in women and men, and the source of that variation is not primarily in the DNA.
Long Telomeres Associated with Increased Lung Cancer Risk
Genetic predisposition for long telomeres predicts increased lung adenocarcinoma risk.
First Artificial Ribosome Designed
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University have engineered a tethered ribosome that works nearly as well as the authentic cellular component, or organelle, that produces all the proteins and enzymes within the cell.
High-Resolution 3D Images Reveal the Muscle Mitochondrial Power Grid
NIH mouse study overturns scientific ideas on energy distribution in muscle.
Expanding the Brain
A team of researchers has identified more than 40 new “imprinted” genes, in which either the maternal or paternal copy of a gene is expressed while the other is silenced.
Identifying a Key Growth Factor in Cell Proliferation
Researchers discover that aspartate is a limiter of cell proliferation.
Study Uncovers Target for Preventing Huntington’s Disease
Scientists from Cardiff University believe that a treatment to prevent or delay the symptoms of Huntington’s disease could now be much closer, following a major breakthrough.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,400+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!