Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Vapourtec Pump Key to Organometallic Process

Published: Wednesday, September 11, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, September 11, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Paper describes a telescoped continuous flow process that produces breast cancer drug Tamoxifen at the rate of one dose every 5 seconds.

A recent academic paper published in the journal Organic Process Research and Development by the Group of Prof Steven V. Ley, Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge outlines a breakthrough in the manufacture of breast cancer drug Tamoxifen involving flow chemistry technology developed by UK specialist chemical engineering firm Vapourtec.

A prominent feature in the success of the research carried out, profiled in the article “Continuous flow-processing of organometallic reagents using an advanced peristaltic pumping system and the telescoped flow synthesis of (E/Z)-tamoxifen”, was the use of Vapourtec’s E-Series flow chemistry system that enables the processing of organometallic reagents.

In June 2013 the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommended that Tamoxifen should be taken by “at-risk” groups of women because the drug can help prevent the contraction of breast cancer.

Specifically the newly developed Vapourtec V-3 pump, a chemically resistant peristaltic pumping system, is at the heart of a process which allows chemists to continually pump highly reactive substances which can permit  the use of exciting reactive intermediates. The utility of such reactive chemicals were then harnessed to prepare Tamoxifen, a hormonal therapy used to treat breast cancer.

Existing approaches for pumping organometallic reagents, such as n-butyllithium, Grignard reagents and DIBAL-H, can present a number of challenges due to sensitivity to air and moisture, however, the V-3 pump eliminates these issues.

Based on the peristaltic principle, the V-3 has been designed so that it can deliver a smooth flow at up to 10 bar pressure and even self prime from pipes that are full of air.

The wetted area inside the V-3 pump is small and can be easily and rapidly dried using an anhydrous solvent. Reagents can be fed directly from a bottle sealed with a septum which eliminates the need to manually handle potential pyrophoric reagents.

The V-3 does not feature check valves or sliding seals which means that the occasional generation of suspended particles of insoluble salts, caused by small amounts of moisture, presents no problem to the process.

Dr Duncan Browne, an experienced post-doc and flow chemist involved in the research project in the Ley Group, Cambridge commented: “The V-3 pump has enabled us to expand previous flow chemical reactions into truly continuous processes that produce significant quantities of materials. The simplified pumping of organometallic species have allowed us to access reactions and reactivity that we have previously found difficult”

Andrew Mansfield, Applications Specialist with Vapourtec, explained: “This is a very important paper from Cambridge University that reports on a significant breakthrough in flow chemistry with our E-series system, incorporating the V-3 pump, proving to be a critical component of the entire process”.

“This is a perfect example of how technological innovation in the field of flow chemistry can deliver more effective and efficiently manufactured solutions for a wide variety of industries, including pharmaceuticals,” concluded Andrew.


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,400+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 3,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Vapourtec Ties in with Singapore Distributor
The company has reinforced its presence in Asia by signing a distribution agreement with Singapore-based Gaia Science.
Tuesday, July 07, 2015
Vapourtec Launches Chinese Collaboration
Research collaboration to develop novel, continuous flow, photochemical reactions using Vapourtec's easy-Photochem reactor system.
Tuesday, May 19, 2015
Continuous Flow of Breakthroughs for Vapourtec
Flow chemistry systems designed and manufactured by Vapourtec have recently reached the milestone of having been cited in 150 peer review publications.
Thursday, December 11, 2014
Vapourtec Expands R-Series Capabilities
UK-based flow chemistry engineering specialists Vapourtec has extended the capabilities of its R-Series system with a new addition to its range of pump modules.
Wednesday, November 19, 2014
Photochemistry Potential Revealed in Application Notes
Four application notes from Vapourtec now available to download in full from the Company’s website.
Thursday, October 09, 2014
Vapourtec Sees Flow Chemistry Growth in India
A distribution partnership with Mumbai-based Pi-Process Intensification has enabled Vapourtec to establish a burgeoning market for its flow chemistry systems.
Tuesday, September 09, 2014
The Future Of Photochemistry
The Vapourtec UV-150 offers potential routes for novel compounds and building blocks together with possible new manufacturing processes.
Wednesday, February 26, 2014
Green Chemistry Hits Full Flow with China UK Partnership
Vapourtec signs agreement with Nanjing University of Technology (NJUT) in China to establish a joint operation in the fast growing, hi tec field of flow chemistry.
Tuesday, December 17, 2013
Vapourtec Reach Twin Milestones
Vapourtec is celebrating has reached the twin milestones of 10 years in business and being featured in 100 peer reviewed publications.
Monday, October 14, 2013
Vapourtec Publishes Flow Chemistry Guide
Vapourtec partners with Dr Nicholas Leadbeater and the New Synthetic Methods Group.
Thursday, September 26, 2013
Scientific News
Study Finds Brain Chemicals that Keep Wakefulness in Check
Researchers to develop new drugs that promote better sleep, or control hyperactivity in people with mania.
Sorting Through Cellular Statistics
Aaron Dinner, professor in chemistry, and his graduate student Herman Gudjonson are trying to read the manual of life, DNA, as part of the Dinner group’s research into bioinformatics—the application of statistics to biological research.
Playing 'Tag' with Pollution lets Scientists See Who's It
Using a climate model that can tag sources of soot from different global regions and can track where it lands on the Tibetan Plateau, researchers have determined which areas around the plateau contribute the most soot — and where.
Women’s Immune System Genes Operate Differently from Men’s
A new technology reveals that immune system genes switch on and off differently in women and men, and the source of that variation is not primarily in the DNA.
Long Telomeres Associated with Increased Lung Cancer Risk
Genetic predisposition for long telomeres predicts increased lung adenocarcinoma risk.
First Artificial Ribosome Designed
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University have engineered a tethered ribosome that works nearly as well as the authentic cellular component, or organelle, that produces all the proteins and enzymes within the cell.
High-Resolution 3D Images Reveal the Muscle Mitochondrial Power Grid
NIH mouse study overturns scientific ideas on energy distribution in muscle.
Expanding the Brain
A team of researchers has identified more than 40 new “imprinted” genes, in which either the maternal or paternal copy of a gene is expressed while the other is silenced.
Identifying a Key Growth Factor in Cell Proliferation
Researchers discover that aspartate is a limiter of cell proliferation.
Study Uncovers Target for Preventing Huntington’s Disease
Scientists from Cardiff University believe that a treatment to prevent or delay the symptoms of Huntington’s disease could now be much closer, following a major breakthrough.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,400+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!