Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Synthetic mRNA can Induce Self-Repair and Regeneration of the Infarcted Heart

Published: Monday, September 16, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, September 16, 2013
Bookmark and Share
A team of scientists has instructing injured hearts in mice to heal by expressing a factor that triggers cardiovascular regeneration driven by native heart stem cells.

The study, published in Nature Biotechnology, also shows that there was an effect on driving the formation of a small number of new cardiac muscle cells.

"This is the beginning of using the heart as a factory to produce growth factors for specific families of cardiovascular stem cells, and suggests that it may be possible to generate new heart parts without delivering any new cells to the heart itself", says Kenneth Chien, a Professor at Karolinska Institutet and Harvard University, who led the research team behind the new findings.

The study is based upon another recent discovery in the Chien lab, which was published in Cell Research. This study shows that VEGFA, a known growth factor for vascular endothelial cells in the adult heart, can also serve as a switch that converts heart stem cells away from becoming cardiac muscle and towards the formation of the coronary vessels in the fetal heart. To coax the heart to make the VEGFA, the investigators in the Nature Biotechnology study used new technology where synthetic messenger RNA (mRNA) that encodes VEGFA is injected into the muscle cell. Then, heart muscle produces a short pulse of VEGFA. The mRNA is synthetically modified so that it escapes the normal defense system of the body that is known to reject and degrade the non-modified mRNA as a viral invader.

The study, performed in mice, shows that only a single administration of a short pulse of expression of VEGFA is required, if it can be delivered to the exact region where the heart progenitors reside. The therapeutic effect is long term, as shown by markedly improved survival following myocardial infarction with a single administration of the synthetic mRNA when given within 48 hours after the heart attack. The long-term effect appears to be based on changing the fate of the native heart stem cells from contributing to cardiac fibrotic scar tissue and towards cardiovascular tissue.

"This moves us very close to clinical studies to regenerate cardiovascular tissue with a single chemical agent without the need for injecting any additional cells into the heart." says Professor Chien.

At the same time, he points out that these are still early days and there remains much to be done. In particular, it will become of interest to engineer new device technology to deliver the synthetic mRNA via conventional catheter technology. It also will be critical to move these studies, which are based in mouse models, to other animals, which is currently in progress.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,000+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,400+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Insights into Early Human Embryo Development
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and the Ludwig Cancer Research in Stockholm have conducted a detailed molecular analysis of the embryo’s first week of development.
Monday, April 11, 2016
Complex Grammar of the Genomic Language
A new study from Karolinska Institutet shows that the ‘grammar’ of the human genetic code is more complex than that of even the most intricately constructed spoken languages in the world.
Thursday, November 12, 2015
New Mechanism Discovered Behind Infant Epilepsy
Scientists at Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital have discovered a new explanation for severe early infant epilepsy.
Monday, September 07, 2015
Stem Cells from Nerves Forming Teeth
Findings published in the scientific journal Nature.
Wednesday, July 30, 2014
Different Cell Mechanisms Behind Regenerated Limbs
Scientists at Karolinska Institutet have discovered that two separate species of salamander differ in the way their muscles grow back in lost body parts.
Tuesday, November 26, 2013
New European Vaccine Initiative
Leading organisations have joined forces to rapidly assess and communicate the benefits and risks of vaccines.
Tuesday, November 26, 2013
Technological Breakthrough Paves the Way for Better Drugs
Researchers have developed the first method for directly measuring the extent to which drugs reach their targets in the cell.
Monday, July 08, 2013
Possible Goal for New Tuberculosis-Vaccine Identified
A new study shows for the first time the essential role of the molecule SOCS3 in the control of Tuberculosis.
Monday, July 08, 2013
Trackable Drug-Filled Nanoparticles - a Potential Weapon against Cancer
Tiny particles filled with a drug could be a new tool for treating cancer in the future.
Monday, March 04, 2013
Learning the Alphabet of Controlling Gene Expression
Scientists at Karolinska Institutet have made a large step towards the understanding of how human genes are regulated.
Monday, January 21, 2013
New Hope for Setback-dogged Cancer Treatment
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet announce breakthrough in the study of how IGF-1 receptor-binding antibodies can help those with cancer.
Wednesday, November 28, 2012
The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet has decided to award the Nobel Prize jointly to John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent.
Tuesday, October 09, 2012
Possible New Therapy for the Treatment of a Common Blood Cancer
Research from Karolinska Institutet shows that sorafenib, a drug used for advanced cancer of the kidneys and liver, could also be effective against multiple myeloma.
Friday, September 07, 2012
New Findings on the Formation of Body Pigment
The skin's pigment cells can be formed from completely different cells than has hitherto been thought, a new study from the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet shows. The results, which are published in the journal Cell, also mean the discovery of a new kind of stem cell.
Thursday, October 22, 2009
Cell-IQ® Cell Imaging System Aids Fertility Research at Karolinska
Cell-IQ® platform helps investigate mechanisms of infertility and oocyte maturation, and for characterization of human embryonic stem cell lines.
Thursday, July 09, 2009
Scientific News
Computational Model Finds New Protein-Protein Interactions
Researchers at University of Pittsburgh have discovered 500 new protein-protein interactions (PPIs) associated with genes linked to schizophrenia.
Experimental Drug Cancels Effect from Key Intellectual Disability Gene
A University of Wisconsin—Madison researcher who studies the most common genetic intellectual disability has used an experimental drug to reverse — in mice — damage from the mutation that causes the syndrome.
MicroRNA Pathway Could Lead to New Avenues for Leukemia Treatment
Cancer researchers at the University of Cincinnati have found a particular signaling route in microRNA (miR-22) that could lead to targets for acute myeloid leukemia, the most common type of fast-growing cancer of the blood and bone marrow.
Bioreactors Ready for the Big Time
Bioreactors are passive filtration systems that can reduce nitrate losses from farm fields.
Analysis of Dog Genome will Provide Insight into Human Disease
An important model in studying human disease, the non-coding RNA of the canine genome is an essential starting point for evolutionary and biomedical studies – according to a new study led by The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC).
‘Mini-Brains’ to Study Zika
Novel tool expected to speed research on brain and drug development.
Finding Factors That Protect Against Flu
A clinical trial examining the body’s response to seasonal flu suggests new approaches for evaluating the effectiveness of seasonal flu vaccines.
New Insights into Gene Regulation
Researchers have solved the three-dimensional structure of a gene repression complex that is known to play a role in cancer.
Controlling RNA in Living Cells
Modular, programmable proteins can be used to track or manipulate gene expression.
Common Class of Cancer Drugs May Not Lead to Cognitive Decline
UCLA study refutes 2015 research suggesting anthracyclines could cause memory loss, other impairments.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,400+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!