Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Method Developed at UT Arlington Allows Quantitative Nanoscopic Imaging Through Silicon

Published: Monday, October 07, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, October 07, 2013
Bookmark and Share
A team of scientists has figured out how to quantitatively observe cellular processes taking place on so-called “lab on a chip” devices in a silicon environment.

The new technology will be useful in drug development as well as disease diagnosis, researchers say.

In a paper published in Nature’s online journal Scientific Reports, the team said it overcame past limitations on quantitative microscopy through an opaque media by working with a new combination of near infrared light and a technique called quantitative phase imaging. Quantitative phase imaging is about a decade old. It uses shifts in phases of light, not staining techniques, to aid specimen imaging – earning the term “label-free.”

 “To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of quantitative phase imaging of cellular structure and function in silicon environment,” said Assistant Professor of Physics Samarendra Mohanty, head of the Biophysics and Physiology Laboratory at UT Arlington and corresponding author on the paper.

The UT Arlington/MIT team was able to prove success in analyzing specimens through a silicon wafer in two instances. In one, they accomplished full-field imaging of the features of red blood cells to nanometer thickness accuracy. In another, they observed dynamic variation of human embryonic kidney cells in response to change in salt concentration. Mohanty believes that his group’s current work on near infrared quantitative phase imaging can lead to non-invasive, label-free monitoring of neuronal activities.

Additional co-authors include: Bipin Joshi and Nelson Cardenas, of UT Arlington; and Ishan Barman, Narahara Chari Dingari, Jaqueline S. Soares and Ramachandra R. Dasari, all of MIT.

“Silicon-based micro devices known as labs-on-a-chip are revolutionizing high throughput analysis of cells and molecules for disease diagnosis and screening of drug effects. However, very little progress has been made in the optical characterization of samples in these systems,” said Joshi, a recent graduate and lead author on the paper.  “The technology we’ve developed is well-suited to meet this need.”

Barman, now an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins University, said the new paper is a prime example of the type of research he hopes to do - projects pulled by needs of the biomedical community and continually pushing the edge of biophotonic solutions.

 “We envision that this significantly expands the visualization possible in silicon based microelectronic and micromechanical devices,” he said.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,000+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

New Breast Cancer Staging System
Neo-Bioscore adds HER2 status into previously developed system.
Monday, March 21, 2016
Prostate Cancer Surgery Improved
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have determined that light reflectance spectroscopy can differentiate between malignant and benign prostate tissue with 85 percent accuracy, a finding that may lead to real-time tissue analysis during prostate cancer surgery.
Monday, March 14, 2016
Leukemia’s Surroundings Key to its Growth
Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered that a type of cancer found primarily in children can grow only when signaled to do so by other nearby cells that are noncancerous.
Friday, February 12, 2016
Flesh-Eating Bacteria Work Together
Scientists recently discovered different strains of deadly flesh-eating bacteria working together to spread infection and they now have a better understanding of the role of the toxins they produce. The discovery could change how the illness and other diseases are treated.
Wednesday, January 27, 2016
Utilizing Antibodies from Ebola Survivors
A collaborative team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Vanderbilt University, The Scripps Research Institute and Integral Molecular Inc. have learned that antibodies in the blood of people who have survived a strain of the Ebola virus can kill various types of Ebola.
Wednesday, January 27, 2016
Mechanism of Tumor Suppressing Gene Uncovered
The most commonly mutated gene in cancer,p53, works to prevent tumor formation by keeping mobile elements in check that otherwise lead to genomic instability, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found.
Tuesday, January 26, 2016
Gene-Editing Halts DMD Progression
Using a new gene-editing technique, a team of scientists from UT Southwestern Medical Center stopped progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in young mice.
Tuesday, January 05, 2016
Fighting Pain with Ketamine
Researchers at the Texas A&M Health Science Center are using ketamine, a drug that already exists as an anesthetic, to treat pain.
Friday, October 16, 2015
NASA Award Grant To Develop Platform For Detecting Amino Acids
A University of Texas at Arlington researcher will develop a platform that could help scientists move one step closer to answering whether life may have existed “out there” or if we are really alone in the universe.
Tuesday, September 08, 2015
Electrical Control of Cancer Cells
Research led by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) has revealed a new electrical mechanism that can control these switches.
Wednesday, August 26, 2015
Mass Extinctions Can Accelerate Evolution
A computer science team at The University of Texas at Austin has found that robots evolve more quickly and efficiently after a virtual mass extinction modeled after real-life disasters such as the one that killed off the dinosaurs.
Tuesday, August 18, 2015
Critical New Insights on DNA Repair
The enzyme fumarase is key to reversing genetic damage leading to cancer and therapy resistance.
Wednesday, August 05, 2015
Researchers Develop Vaccine that Protects Primates Against Ebola
A collaborative team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and the National Institutes of Health have developed an inhalable vaccine that protects primates against Ebola.
Thursday, July 23, 2015
Can Cell Cycle Protein Prevent or Kill Breast Cancer Tumors?
An MD Anderson study has shown the potential of a simple molecule involved in cancer metabolism as a powerful therapeutic.
Monday, July 20, 2015
Partly Human Yeast Show A Common Ancestor’s Lasting Legacy
Edward Marcotte and his colleagues at the University of Texas at Austin created hundreds of strains of humanized yeast by inserting into each a single human gene and turning off the corresponding yeast gene.
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
Scientific News
Flowering Regulation Mechanism Discovered
Monash researchers have discovered a new mechanism that enables plants to regulate their flowering in response to raised temperatures.
Turning Skin Cells into Heart, Brain Cells
In a major breakthrough, scientists at the Gladstone Institutes transformed skin cells into heart cells and brain cells using a combination of chemicals.
Nanoparticles Present Sustainable Way to Grow Food Crops
Nanoparticle technology can help reduce the need for fertilizer, creating a more sustainable way to grow crops such as mung beans.
How Scientists Use DNA to Track Disease Outbreaks
They’re the top questions on everyone’s mind when a new disease outbreak happens: where did the virus come from? When did this happen? How long has it been spreading in a particular country or group of people?
Genetic Risk Factors of Disparate Diseases Share Similar Biological Underpinnings
Penn Institute for Biomedical Informatics and colleagues identify "roadmap" of disease mechanisms to identify candidate drug targets.
Drugs that May Combat Deadly Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Uncovered
Study identifies 79 compounds that inhibit carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE).
Stem Cells Know How to Unwind
Research led by the Babraham Institute with collaborators in the UK, Canada and Japan has revealed a new understanding of how an open genome structure supports the long-term and unrestricted developmental potential in embryonic stem cells.
HIV Particles Used to Trap Intact Mammalian Protein Complexes
Belgian scientists from VIB and UGent developed Virotrap, a viral particle sorting approach for purifying protein complexes under native conditions.
Childhood Asthma Research Receives $2M
Research into the impact of a child’s upbringing and social and physical environments on the development of asthma will receive $2 million to tackle the condition that affects as many as one in three Canadians.
Growing Stem Cells More Safely
Nurturing stem cells atop a bed of mouse cells works well, but is a non-starter for transplants to patients – Brown University scientists are developing a synthetic bed instead.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,500+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!