Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Communities
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Evonik Opens a New Plant in Argentina

Published: Monday, October 21, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, October 21, 2013
Bookmark and Share
With an annual capacity of over 60,000 metric tons, the new production plant will supply ready-to-use alkoxides for use as catalysts in biodiesel production from renewable raw materials.

On October 21, 2013, Evonik Industries started up a new plant for manufacturing biodiesel-production catalysts in Argentina. 

Patrik Wohlhauser, the member of the Evonik Executive Board responsible for the South America Region, spoke at the dedication ceremony, where he underscored the importance of investment in South America: "We're investing in Argentina, because we want to take advantage of the opportunities for long-term success that the South American market has to offer. As one of the world's leading providers of biodiesel-production catalysts, we wish to continue consolidating and expanding our position," Wohlhauser remarked at the plant opening. He then added, "The investment is both a clear acknowledgment of our commitment in South America, as well as part of our strategy, which we hope will allow us to participate in the region's growth." 

The new facilities will serve primarily the Argentine and Brazilian markets. Evonik located the plant on the same site as Terminal 6 S.A., which operates a large biodiesel facility. 

As Jan Van den Bergh, president of Evonik's Advanced Intermediates Business Unit, explains, "Our aim in building the plant in Puerto General San Martín in the Rosario Region—in the heart of Argentina's biodiesel industry—is to supply our South American customers with locally produced, high-quality catalysts." 

Evonik has proven expertise in the production of biodiesel catalysts, backed up by many years of experience. In 2009, the company started up a new production facility in Mobile, Alabama, USA, with a capacity of 60,000 metric tons p.a. Evonik products from this plant meet the demand for biodiesel on the North American market. Following the success of the new production technology in the United States, the same type of plant was built in Argentina. The new technology involves directly reacting alcohol with sodium hydroxide to produce alkoxides. 

Evonik already ranks among the world leaders in biodiesel catalysts—a position it also holds in South America. "The new facility in Argentina will allow us to strengthen our business, both globally and within the region," explained Weber Ferreira Porto, the regional president for South America. "Our aim here is to participate in the development of the biodiesel market, which is forecast to experience positive growth over the medium term." Evonik is a global market leader in specialty catalysts for biodiesel production. In addition to its facilities in Argentina, the company also operates production sites in Niederkassel-Lülsdorf, near Cologne, Germany, and Mobile, Alabama, USA. 

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Evonik Commences Isophorone Facilities in China
Investment exceeding €100 million targets dynamic markets in Asia.
Thursday, May 22, 2014
Biotech Company Algal Scientific Receives Investment Funding
Evonik, part of an investors’ consortium that is investing more than US$3 million in Series A financing round, is investing in the startup.
Monday, April 28, 2014
Prize Awarded to New Membrane Technology from Evonik
Biogas processing considerably more efficient and environmentally friendly.
Thursday, December 05, 2013
Evonik Expanding Global Isophorone and Isophorone Diamine Capacities
New production plants to be completed in early 2014, significantly increasing the total capacities of IP and IPD.
Friday, November 15, 2013
Scientific News
High Throughput Mass Spectrometry-Based Screening Assay Trends
Dr John Comley provides an insight into HT MS-based screening with a focus on future user requirements and preferences.
Kitchen Utensils Can Spread Bacteria Between Foods
In a recent study researchers found that produce that contained bacteria would contaminate other produce items through the continued use of knives or graters—the bacteria would latch on to the utensils commonly found in consumers' homes and spread to the next item.
Exploring the Causes of Cancer
Queen's research to understand the regulation of a cell surface protein involved in cancer.
Safer, Faster Way To Remove Pollutants From Water
Using nanoparticles filled with enzymes proves more effective than current methods.
Drug May Prevent Life-Threatening Muscle Loss in Advanced Cancers
New data describes how an experimental drug can stop life-threatening muscle wasting (cachexia) associated with advanced cancers and restore muscle health.
Ancient Viral Molecules Essential for Human Development
Genetic material from ancient viral infections is critical to human development, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
Novel Tumor Treatment
In the first published results from a $386,000 National Cancer Institute grant awarded earlier this year, a paper by Scott Verbridge and Rafael Davalos has been published.
Speeding Up the Process of Making Vaccines
System uses a freeze-dry concept to develop "just-add-water" solution.
Chemical Design Made Easier
Rice University scientists prepare elusive organocatalysts for drug and fine chemical synthesis.
New Analysis Technique for Chiral Activity in Molecules
Professor Hyunwoo Kim of the Chemistry Department and his research team have developed a technique that can easily analyze the optical activity of charged compounds by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos