Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Communities
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

New Genetic Mutation Helps Explain Development of Eczema

Published: Monday, November 04, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, November 04, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Researchers found that a mutation in the gene Matt/Tmem79 led to the development of spontaneous dermatitis in mice.

Scientists collaborating on an international research project led by Trinity College Dublin and the University of Dundee have identified a new genetic mutation linked to the development of a type of eczema known as atopic dermatitis (AD).

The gene, Matt/Tmem79, is involved in producing a protein, now called ‘mattrin’. However, protein expression was defective in individuals with the mutant gene, and this led to skin problems. In humans, mattrin is expressed within the cells that produce and maintain the skin’s function as a barrier. 

After identifying the relationship between the mutation and AD, the scientists looked for a similar pattern in people. They screened large cohorts of patients that suffered from AD, comparing them with unaffected control patients, and found that the equivalent human gene MATT/TMEM79 was similarly associated. The results of this study are published in the November issue of the leading peer-reviewed journal in allergy research, The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Professor Padraic Fallon, Chair of Translational Immunology in the School of Medicine at Trinity, who led the project, said:  “We have identified a new gene mutation that leads to atopic dermatitis (AD) in mice, and have taken that work further to demonstrate that a variant of the human gene is associated with AD in patients.”

Professor Fallon added: “This study highlights the value of research in which genetic patterns in animals provide a starting point to investigating human disease. This strategy enables us to identify new genes that are relevant in human disease and then examine the function of these genes during inflammation. This approach will ultimately help us to understand the factors leading to inflammatory diseases and assist in the development of new therapeutic strategies.”

Professor Irwin McLean, Scientific Director of the Centre for Dermatology and Genetic Medicine at the University of Dundee, jointly led the research that involved collaboration between scientists in Ireland, the United Kingdom, USA, Germany and Singapore. The work was funded by grants from the Wellcome Trust, Science Foundation Ireland and the National Children’s Research Centre.

Professor McLean added: “This study shows that disruption of the barrier function of the skin is a key driving force in the development of eczema.  Without an intact skin barrier, foreign substances can enter the body and trigger inflammation and allergy.”

AD is the most commonly diagnosed skin condition, affecting up to 20% of children. As well as having a genetic basis, the condition can also be triggered by environmental factors, such as pet fur, pollen and house dustmites. Dairy products, eggs, nuts and wheat have also been linked to the condition.

The article can be accessed online using the link below. 

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Blueprinting Cell Membrane Proteins
Recent breakthrough will make the blueprinting process faster, easier and cheaper, and should have major implications in the field of drug discovery and development.
Monday, June 08, 2015
Inflammation Stops The Clock
Researchers at Trinity College Dublin and the University of Pennsylvania have uncovered an important link between our body clock and the immune system that will have relevance to the treatment of inflammatory and infectious diseases.
Wednesday, May 20, 2015
Grazing Animals ‘Rescue’ Biodiversity Threatened by Fertiliser
Damaging impacts of fertiliser offset by herbivorous grazers, whose actions enhance the amount of sunlight available to lots of precious species.
Monday, March 10, 2014
Fertilization Destabilizes Grassland Ecosystems on a Global Scale
Collaborative research across five continents shows that fertilization drives the same damaging patterns seen in different grassland ecosystems across the planet.
Tuesday, February 18, 2014
New Cloud Computing System that can Reduce Carbon Emissions
The ‘Stratus’ system shares server load to meet green and cost-related goals of companies.
Wednesday, January 15, 2014
Scientists Discover Genetic Basis for Memory Formation with Implications for Neurological Diseases
Two genes linked to simple memory formation also regulate appropriate nerve responses that are lacking in related disease sufferers.
Monday, December 23, 2013
Elliot Meyerowitz Receives Trinity College Dublin Dawson Prize in Genetics
World-renowned plant biologist honoured for his contribution to genetics at Trinity.
Monday, December 09, 2013
Genetic Mutation Could Increase Understanding of ADHD
Absence of normal gene that expresses a protein involved in nerve cell communication results in seizures and hyperactivity.
Wednesday, November 27, 2013
International Research Project Identifies a New Genetic Mutation that Helps Explain the Development of Eczema
Scientists have identified a new genetic mutation linked to the development of a type of eczema known as atopic dermatitis (AD).
Monday, November 04, 2013
Scientists Propose a Molecular Explanation for Degenerative Disease
An international collaboration has shed new light on the origins and molecular causes of age related degenerative conditions including Motor Neurone Disease (MND).
Monday, August 19, 2013
Scientists Solve Structure of Important Protein in Energy Storage of Cells
Scientists at Trinity College Dublin, using a highly specialised crystallography technique have solved a large protein structure that will increase our understanding of energy generation and storage in cells.
Wednesday, July 18, 2012
Scientific News
High Throughput Mass Spectrometry-Based Screening Assay Trends
Dr John Comley provides an insight into HT MS-based screening with a focus on future user requirements and preferences.
Kitchen Utensils Can Spread Bacteria Between Foods
In a recent study researchers found that produce that contained bacteria would contaminate other produce items through the continued use of knives or graters—the bacteria would latch on to the utensils commonly found in consumers' homes and spread to the next item.
Exploring the Causes of Cancer
Queen's research to understand the regulation of a cell surface protein involved in cancer.
Safer, Faster Way To Remove Pollutants From Water
Using nanoparticles filled with enzymes proves more effective than current methods.
Drug May Prevent Life-Threatening Muscle Loss in Advanced Cancers
New data describes how an experimental drug can stop life-threatening muscle wasting (cachexia) associated with advanced cancers and restore muscle health.
Ancient Viral Molecules Essential for Human Development
Genetic material from ancient viral infections is critical to human development, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
Novel Tumor Treatment
In the first published results from a $386,000 National Cancer Institute grant awarded earlier this year, a paper by Scott Verbridge and Rafael Davalos has been published.
Speeding Up the Process of Making Vaccines
System uses a freeze-dry concept to develop "just-add-water" solution.
Chemical Design Made Easier
Rice University scientists prepare elusive organocatalysts for drug and fine chemical synthesis.
New Analysis Technique for Chiral Activity in Molecules
Professor Hyunwoo Kim of the Chemistry Department and his research team have developed a technique that can easily analyze the optical activity of charged compounds by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos