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Singapore: A Vibrant Hub for Biomedical Scientists

Published: Friday, December 20, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, December 20, 2013
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Ng Siew Kiang, Executive Director for Contact Singapore, discusses the growth of the biomedical sector in Singapore.

Contact Singapore is an alliance of the Singapore Economic Development Board and Ministry of Manpower, which supports professionals and academics from across the globe seeking opportunities to work and live in Singapore. 

Recently, Singapore announced a novel discovery involving the use of nanodiamonds to boost the treatment of chemo-resistant leukaemia. The use of tiny diamonds to facilitate the delivery of drug to leukemic cells was developed by the National University of Singapore (NUS) in partnership with the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). In fact, such breakthroughs in areas from cancer and stem cell biology, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, infectious diseases and neurosciences are commonplace in Singapore. Our research sector is a dynamic, fast-paced environment powered by a community of outstanding scientists and researchers. 

What makes Singapore stand out is our focus on forging collaboration between public and private sector research.  The Biopolis is a shiny beacon of this philosophy. Completed in 2006, this state-of-the-art research facility for biomedical and life sciences houses both public and corporate laboratories, offering unprecedented opportunities for collaboration and the integration of scientific capabilities that has propelled Singapore into a global biomedical sciences hub. 

Another example of knowledge-sharing and communication across different facets of industry is the Academia, an advanced facility which integrates pathology, medical education and research all under the same roof. The 13-storey twin-tower building which opened in July 2013 houses Singapore General Hospital’s pathology services, research laboratories, and education and training facilities of Singapore’s largest healthcare group, SingHealth. 

With such exciting investments come significant opportunities for researchers from all over the world to take up positions in Singapore. 

Singapore has long been at the forefront in supporting and promoting R&D efforts in Asia.  This is demonstrated not only by the calibre of public sector professionals and institutions based here, but also through the government’s active support of private sector research activity from corporate laboratories. 

Already, more than 50 global companies in Singapore are carrying out biomedical sciences R&D, which include drug discovery, translational and clinical research, supported by the government’s commitment to provide £8.3 billion of overall national funding across a range of research disciplines in its latest 5-year master plan ending in 2015.  

Over 6,000 researchers from across the globe currently live and work in Singapore. These companies and individuals have chosen Singapore for its reputation as a vibrant research environment, and because they recognise its potential to grow and develop further in years to come. Aside from a fast-growing research and academic environment, Singapore has a reputation for being one of the world’s most liveable cities, making it an ideal location for overseas professionals looking for a new challenge.

If you’d like to find out more about pursuing career opportunities in Singapore, please visit the link below for more information. 


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