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Illumina Introduces the HiSeq X™ Ten Sequencing System

Published: Thursday, January 16, 2014
Last Updated: Wednesday, January 15, 2014
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Breaks barriers with world's first $1,000 genome, enables 'factory' scale sequencing for population and disease studies.

Illumina, Inc. broke the 'sound barrier' of human genomics by enabling the $1,000 genome. This achievement is made possible by the new HiSeq X Ten Sequencing System. This platform includes dramatic technology breakthroughs that enable researchers to undertake studies of unprecedented scale by providing the throughput to sequence tens of thousands of human whole genomes in a single year in a single lab.

Initial customers for the transformative HiSeq X Ten System include Macrogen, a global next-generation sequencing service organization based in Seoul, South Korea and its CLIA laboratory in Rockville, Maryland, the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the world's leading research institute in genomic medicine, and the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Sydney, Australia, a world leader in biomedical research.

"The sequencing capacity and economies of scale of the HiSeq X Ten facility will also allow Garvan to accelerate the introduction of clinical genomics and next-generation medicine in Australia," said Professor John Mattick, Executive Director of the Garvan Institute of Medical Research. "We expect the HiSeq X Ten to underpin a new phase of collaboration between government, industry and other medical research stakeholders."

"For the first time, it looks like it will be possible to deliver the $1,000 genome, which is tremendously exciting," said Eric Lander, founding director of the Broad Institute and a professor of biology at MIT. "The HiSeq X Ten should give us the ability to analyze complete genomic information from huge sample populations. Over the next few years, we have an opportunity to learn as much about the genetics of human disease as we have learned in the history of medicine."

"Macrogen will deploy this groundbreaking technology to open a new era of large-scale, whole genome sequencing in our certified CLIA laboratory," said Dr. Jeong-Sun Seo, Chairman of Macrogen. "Additionally, we will use the HiSeq X Ten to continue our collaboration with the Genomic Medicine Institute of Seoul National University focused on sequencing Asian populations in order to build a genomics database for use in medical research and healthcare applications."

Added Jay Flatley, CEO of Illumina, "With the HiSeq X Ten, we're delivering the $1,000 genome, reshaping the economics and scale of human genome sequencing, and redefining the possibilities for population-level studies in shaping the future of healthcare. The ability to explore the human genome on this scale will bring the study of cancer and complex diseases to a new level. Breaking the 'sound barrier' of human genetics not only pushes us through a psychological milestone, it enables projects of unprecedented scale. We are excited to see what lies on the other side."

HiSeq X™ Ten - Population Power
The HiSeq X Ten is the world's first platform to deliver full coverage human genomes for less than $1,000, inclusive of typical instrument depreciation, DNA extraction, library preparation, and estimated labor. Purpose-built for population-scale human whole genome sequencing, the HiSeq X Ten is an ideal platform for scientists and institutions focused on the discovery of genotypic variation to enable a deeper understanding of human biology and genetic disease. It can sequence tens of thousands of samples annually with high-quality, high-coverage sequencing, delivering a comprehensive catalog of human variation within and outside coding regions.

Building on the proven performance of Illumina SBS technology, HiSeq X Ten utilizes a number of advanced design features to generate massive throughput. Patterned flow cells, which contain billions of nanowells at fixed locations, combined with a new clustering chemistry deliver a significant increase in data density (6 billion clusters per run). Using optics and faster chemistry, HiSeq X Ten can process sequencing flow cells more quickly than ever before - generating a 10x increase in daily throughput when compared to current HiSeq® 2500 performance.

The HiSeq X Ten is sold as a set of 10 or more ultra-high throughput sequencing systems, each generating up to 1.8 terabases (Tb) of sequencing data in less than three days or up to 600 gigabases (Gb) per day, per system, providing the throughput to sequence tens of thousands of high-quality, high-coverage genomes per year.

The HiSeq X Ten Sequencing System will ship in Q1 2014.

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