Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Designer Protein to Prevent Prostate Cancer Cell Growth

Published: Friday, January 17, 2014
Last Updated: Friday, January 17, 2014
Bookmark and Share
Researchers are creating a "designer" protein that could be effective at treating prostate cancer when other therapies fail.

In laboratory tests, the protein hindered the growth of cancer cells even in conditions where conventional therapies are ineffective.

The researchers, from Imperial College London and the University of Essex, hope to develop the protein into a therapeutic that could be trialled in patients within five years.

The findings are published today in the journal Oncotarget.

Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer in men. Around 37,000 UK men are diagnosed with the disease each year. Many prostate cancers develop very slowly, but in a small proportion of cases the cancer grows more quickly and spreads to other areas of the body, sometimes proving fatal.

Prostate cancers are only able to grow when they are exposed to male hormones such as testosterone. These hormones bring about their effects by binding to specific receptors. Many existing therapies target these receptors, yet after an average of two years the cancer becomes resistant to treatment. In this phase, hormones continue to drive the growth of cancer cells.

In this new study, the researchers have designed a new protein which blocks the hormone receptors and consequently stops prostate cancer cells from growing in the laboratory. The therapy was successful even in circumstances that lead to the failure of conventional treatments.

Dr Charlotte Bevan, senior author of the study, from the Department of Surgery and Cancer at Imperial College London said: "Eleven thousand men die from prostate cancer each year in the UK. Existing treatments are good at first but frequently fail after a couple of years. Once the cancer moves to the more aggressive stage, there are few therapies available.

"Our team is seeking to design a new therapy that will help patients once the other ones have failed. There is a lot of research supporting the idea that the androgen receptor continues to drive prostate cancer growth, so we have been investigating novel methods to block this pathway." 

The team is designing a novel therapy by combining two separate proteins to create a hybrid. One half binds to the receptor, whilst the other half blocks the receptor's activity. The research demonstrates that both of these factors are important in blocking activity, and consequently the growth of the cancer. 

"So far, the research has only been carried out in prostate cancer cells in the laboratory.  These proof of principle experiments are really promising, but more work is needed before these therapies are ready for clinical trials" said Dr Greg Brooke, first author of the study, now at the School of Biological Sciences, University of Essex. "The next step is to continue research in cell models to refine the therapy into something that is specific, potent and easy to deliver.

"It's exciting to think that this research could offer new hope for men with advanced prostate cancer."

This work was supported by Prostate Cancer UK (formerly Prostate Action), The Martin Harris Research Fellowship, Imperial Innovations and Johnson & Johnson Services Inc., an affiliate of Johnson & Johnson Innovation.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 5,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Blood Pressure Drug May Boost Effectiveness of Lung Cancer Treatment
Researchers at Imperial College London have suggested that the blood pressure drug may make a type of lung cancer treatment more effective.
Wednesday, September 28, 2016
Feeding Babies Egg and Peanut May Prevent Food Allergy
The new analysis pools all existing data, and suggests introducing egg and peanut at an early age may prevent the development of allergy.
Wednesday, September 21, 2016
Dengue Vaccine May Increase Risk of Severe Disease
The world's only licensed vaccine for dengue may worsen subsequent dengue infections if used in areas with low rates of dengue infection.
Friday, September 02, 2016
Breast Milk Sugar Protect Newborns Against Meningitis
Research suggests breat milk sugar can protect against Group B streptococcus, a leading cause of meningitis.
Thursday, September 01, 2016
Breast Milk Sugar May Protect Babies Against Deadly Infection
Researchers from Imperial College London find that a sugar found in some women’s breast milk may protect babies against Group B streptococcus.
Friday, August 26, 2016
MRSA – Just Add Salt
Scientists have discoved a new way to attack Staphylococcus aureus through salt content mechanisms
Friday, August 19, 2016
Flu Vaccine May Reduce Death Risk of Type 2 Diabetes
New research suggests that a new flu vaccine may reduce probability of type 2 diabetes patients being hospitalised with stroke and heart failure.
Tuesday, July 26, 2016
Zika Epidemic Likely to End Within Three Years
A team of scientists has predicted that the current Zika epidemic is likely to end within three years because there will be too few people left to infect.
Friday, July 15, 2016
Sound Waves May Hold Potential to Treat Twin Pregnancy Complications
Researchers at Imperial College London have found that the high energy sound waves could treat a potentially deadly complication that affects some twin pregnancies.
Friday, July 15, 2016
Viral hepatitis kills as Many as Malaria, TB or HIV/AIDS
Viral hepatitis is one of the leading killers across the globe, with a death toll that matches AIDS or tuberculosis.
Thursday, July 07, 2016
Supplement May Switch off Cravings for High-Calorie Foods
Researchers have found that inulin-propionate ester supplement curbs cravings for junk food.
Saturday, July 02, 2016
Dengue Virus Exposure May Amplify Zika Infection
Researchers at Imperial College London have found that the previous exposure to the dengue virus may increase the potency of Zika infection.
Friday, June 24, 2016
£14m EU Project To Aid Meningitis Diagnosis and Cut Antibiotic Use
An international team of doctors are aiming to develop a rapid test to allow medics to quickly identify bacterial infection in children.
Wednesday, June 22, 2016
New Bio-Glass Could Make it Possible to Re-Grow or Replace Cartilage
Researchers at Imperial College London have developed a material that can mimic cartilage and potentially encourage it to re-grow.
Wednesday, May 18, 2016
Gene Expression Controls Revealed
Researchers have modelled every atom in a key part of the process for switching on genes, revealing a whole new area for potential drug targets.
Tuesday, May 17, 2016
Scientific News
Mass Spec Technology Drives Innovation Across the Biopharma Workflow
With greater resolving power, analytical speed, and accuracy, new mass spectrometry technology and techniques are infiltrating the biopharmaceuticals workflow.
One Step Closer to Precision Medicine for Chronic Lung Disease Sufferers
A study led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and National Jewish Health, has provided evidence of links between SNPs and known COPD blood protein biomarkers.
Blood Pressure Drug May Boost Effectiveness of Lung Cancer Treatment
Researchers at Imperial College London have suggested that the blood pressure drug may make a type of lung cancer treatment more effective.
Insight into Eye Diseases
Scientists recreate zebrafish cell regeneration from retinal stem cells in mice.
Gene Regulation in Brain May Explain Repetitive Behaviors in Rett Syndrome Patients
The research could be a key step in developing treatments to eliminate symptoms that drastically impair the quality of life in Rett patients.
Heart Arrhythmia Caused by Mosaic of Mutant Cells
Researchers have solved the genetic mystery of an infant suffering from heart arrhythmia.
Iron Nanoparticles Make Immune Cells Attack Cancer
Researchers accidentally discover that nanoparticles invented for anemia treatment can trigger the immune system’s ability to destroy tumor cells.
Crispr Toolbox Expanded By Protein
Researchers have shown a newly discovered CRISPR protein has two distinct RNA cutting activities.
CES Score May Predict Response to Cancer Treatment
Researchers identify new type of biomarker that helps predict prognosis and response to several types of cancer treatment.
Uncovering Cancer’s ‘Invisibility Cloak’
Researchers discover cancer cell mechanism to become invisible to the body's immune system.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,000+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!