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University of Liverpool Awarded £5 M to Control Campylobacter Infection

Published: Monday, January 27, 2014
Last Updated: Monday, January 27, 2014
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Researchers in the Institute of Infection and Global Health to tackle Campylobacter, which is caused by people eating contaminated chicken meat.

Professors Sarah O'Brien, Malcolm Bennett, Tom Humphrey and Craig Winstanley - in conjunction with the Health Protection Agency and academic partners from across the UK - have received a prestigious award from the joint Research Council Initiative on the Environmental and Social Ecology of Human Infectious Diseases (ESEI) to investigate the causes and sources of the seasonality ofCampylobacter infection in people and animals.

Professor Tom Humphrey, Dr Paul Wigley and Dr Nicola Williams are also working on a new project which focuses on control mechanisms to reduce Campylobacter infection in farmed broiler chickens.  Funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), the Food Standards Agency (FSA), and major poultry producers and retailers, the study will examine how the welfare of chickens can impact on their susceptibility to infection and allow more effective control measure to be put in place.


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