Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Halal Meat Authenticity Testing Reassures Consumers of No Pig or Horse Contamination

Published: Tuesday, January 28, 2014
Last Updated: Tuesday, January 28, 2014
Bookmark and Share
New LC/MS/MS-based meat speciation method allows food testing laboratories to detect pig and horse contamination in diverse food products, with higher accuracy than existing methods.

The mislabelling of meat products sold for human consumption has serious implications from a safety and ethical perspective.  With recent news stories of pork and horsemeat contamination in different parts of the world, a renewed need for specialised testing of the food supply chain has rapidly arisen.  

For Muslim and Jewish communities, in particular, it is critical for consumers to know whether there is even the slightest contamination of foods that are considered permissible to eat (‘halal’ and ‘kosher’), having been prepared in accordance with Islamic or Jewish beliefs, respectively.  

To help serve the interests of these communities that together make up approximately 23% of the global population, scientists at the University of Münster, Germany, along with scientists from AB SCIEX, a global leader in analytical technology, have developed a new method for detecting pig and horse contamination of meat, including beef, chicken, lamb and others.

Major concerns about inaccurate, fraudulent or misleading labelling of meat-based products were raised during 2013 following numerous reports of horse and pig meat being detected, but not disclosed as contents, in beef-based products sold in supermarket chains across Europe.  Moving forward, this new method from the University of Münster and AB SCIEX allows food testing laboratories to test products quickly and easily for trace amounts of pig and horse contamination.

The new method, which was recently published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, uses liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) to detect a number of biomarker peptides that are specific to pig and/or horse.

“Scientists in routine testing laboratories worldwide will now be able to use this method to detect and distinguish trace amounts of pig and horse in many food products,” said Prof. Dr. Hans-Ulrich Humpf, Head of the Institut für Lebensmittelchemie [Institute for Food Chemistry], University of Münster. 

“We are continuing our AB SCIEX tradition in partnering with experts in industry and academia to develop analytical tools that solve big problems,” said Vincent Paez, Senior Director of Food & Environmental at AB SCIEX.  “The halal testing method is a new tool that effectively addresses the safety, religious, ethical and dietary concerns of consumers who avoid products with pig and horse meat.”

As a leader in next-generation food testing technologies, AB SCIEX has previously developed similar methods for protein screening in food, including new techniques for detecting allergens such as eggs, milk, sesame seeds, nuts, and mustard simultaneously in food samples.  Scientists at AB SCIEX are continuing to look into other similar areas of ethical concern, including detection of gelatin that has come from species such as beef and pork.

Technical Deep-dive
The new mass spectrometry-based method offers a more accurate and reliable approach to meat speciation than other methods.   It can detect markers of multiple, different animal species in a single run vs. traditional methods, such as PCR or ELISA.  These older, widely-used approaches detect the animal’s DNA or intact animal proteins, respectively, but both of these approaches have limitations, particularly their lack of specificity, which can lead to false negative or false positive findings. 

The new method was developed using a two-pronged LC/MS/MS approach, using the TripleTOF® 5600 system first to identify the unique protein markers specific to a meat species, then the QTRAP® 5500 system to detect and confirm the presence of targeted meat peptides in unknown samples.

The QTRAP® 5500 system uses multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) to detect each peptide and is then capable of providing sequence information by acquiring a product ion scan for each triggered MRM, which can be used to confirm the peptide’s identity.   

“One of our goals was to develop a method that could be widely and routinely used by scientists in food testing labs, many of which have suitable mass spectrometry platforms,” said Dr. Jens Brockmeyer, Research Group Leader at the Institut für Lebensmittelchemie, University of Münster. “We also wanted to raise awareness of the new possibilities of MRM3 experiments with the QTRAP System, which can significantly improve sensitivity and specificity.”

Horse and beef protein markers may differ by as little as one or two amino acids, so it is important to have confidence in the results when distinguishing between species in food testing.  The new method presents the first MRM and MRM3 method for rapid and sensitive detection of both species (down to 0.13-0.25%), using routinely available MS techniques.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,000+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

SCIEX, QPS Holdings Collaborate
Agreement aims to advance the hybrid LBA-LCMS workflow for biologics quantification.
Wednesday, April 06, 2016
SCIEX, Children's Medical Research Institute Collaborate
SCIEX industrialized proteomics solutions, using SWATH® Acquisition-based workflows and powered by the OneOmics™ Project, will enable large scale proteome studies to advance cancer research.
Thursday, February 11, 2016
SCIEX, A*STAR’s BTI Launch Collaboration
Agreement aims to boost innovation of protein drugs that target new diseases and are safer for patients.
Wednesday, January 27, 2016
SCIEX, Pressure BioSciences Partner
SCIEX and Pressure BioSciences to offer complete solution for next-generation proteomics, to increase the reproducibility and depth of proteomic analysis.
Wednesday, January 13, 2016
SCIEX, University of Manchester Partner
SWATH® Acquisition-based next-generation proteomics technology promises to make industrial proteomics a reality.
Thursday, October 29, 2015
SCIEX Partners with the Paulovich Lab at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Collaboration targets research reproducibility crisis with highly validated multiplex quantitation assays.
Wednesday, September 23, 2015
SCIEX and New Objective Announce Partnership
New nanospray sources to offer maximum sensitivity and robustness for NanoLC-MS.
Tuesday, June 02, 2015
SCIEX and New Objective Partner
Partnership will provide advanced nanospray ionization technologies for next-generation proteomics.
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
SCIEX and Hepregen Announce Co-Marketing Agreement
Alliance establishes SCIEX and Hepregen as a one-stop solution provider for drug metabolism investigators.
Friday, May 22, 2015
Sciex, Hepregen Team up on Metabolite Identification Offering
This recently announced collaboration aims to provide practical solutions for drug metabolism researchers.
Thursday, May 21, 2015
Dr. Gyula Vigh wins Arnold O. Beckman Award
SCIEX sponsored award recognizes outstanding contributions to the field of electrodriven separation techniques.
Thursday, May 07, 2015
SCIEX and Mass Consortium Corporation Announce Exclusive Reseller Agreement
SCIEX to provide customers with XCMSplus software solution for simplified and accelerated metabolomics workflows.
Tuesday, March 31, 2015
SCIEX Announces OneOmics™ Collaborators
Advaita Bioinformatics, Researchers at Yale University and ISB launch applications and libraries that combine next-generation proteomics and next-generation sequencing data in innovative ways.
Thursday, March 19, 2015
SCIEX and Labor Berlin Collaboration to Advance Forensic Testing
Collaboration for the development of a hybrid Quadrupole Time-of-Flight (TOF) MS/MS reference library.
Thursday, March 05, 2015
New Capabilities for Bioanalysis Studies at the International Pharmaceutical Research Center
AB SCIEX Triple Quad™ 6500 LC/MS/MS systems enable new levels of sensitivity for clinical trials of inhaled drugs.
Wednesday, February 11, 2015
Scientific News
The Rise of 3D Cell Culture and in vitro Model Systems for Drug Discovery and Toxicology
An overview of the current technology and the challenges and benefits over 2D cell culture models plus some of the latest advances relating to human health research.
Scientists Find Evidence That Cancer Can Arise Changes
Researchers at Rockefeller University have found a mutation that affects the proteins that package DNA without changing the DNA itself can cause a rare form of cancer.
Developing a More Precise Seasonal Flu Vaccine
During the 2014-15 flu season, the poor match between the virus used to make the world’s vaccine stocks and the circulating seasonal virus yielded a vaccine that was less than 20 percent effective.
A Peachy Defense System for Seeds
ETH chemists are developing a new coating method to protect seeds from being eaten by insects. In doing so, they have drawn inspiration from the humble peach and a few of its peers.
Fighting Cancer with Borrowed Immunity
A new step in cancer immunotherapy: researchers from the Netherlands Cancer Institute and University of Oslo/Oslo University Hospital show that even if one's own immune cells cannot recognize and fight their tumors, someone else's immune cells might.
Modified Microalgae Converts Sunlight into Valuable Medicine
A special type of microalgae can soon produce valuable chemicals such as cancer treatment drugs and much more just by harnessing energy from the sun.
Breakthrough Approach to Breast Cancer Treatment
Scripps scientists have designed a drug candidate that decreases growth of breast cancer cells.
Loss Of Y Chromosome Increases Risk Of Alzheimer’s
Men with blood cells that do not carry the Y chromosome are at greater risk of being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. This is in addition to an increased risk of death from other causes, including many cancers. These new findings by researchers at Uppsala University could lead to a simple test to identify those at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
Making Virus Sensors Cheap and Simple
Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin demonstrated the ability to detect single viruses in a solution containing murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV).
A Guide to CRISPR Gene Activation
A comparison of synthetic gene-activating Cas9 proteins can help guide research and development of therapeutic approaches.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,500+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!